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Offline LaryTopic starter
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« on: June 02, 2009, 10:01:24 am »
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I like the idea of getting written permission for doing some hunting on private property.  Especially if it is someone that I am approaching that I don't know.  I wouldn't see the need for getting written permission for a friends property although I could see how problems could come up from that as well.  Has anyone ever had someone they have approached ask for a "share" of whatever is found?  If so, what is your experience with this?  I have looked over a very old piece of property near here that I know is "off limits" that is bounded by private properties; some residential and some industrial.  I was considering coming up with a form letter to pepper the area with in hopes of getting at least some response without a lot of leg work.  I noticed someone post that it may be less intimidating for people when your not knocking on thier door.  Does anyone have any experience with doing this?

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Offline outback
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« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2009, 10:13:04 am »
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Ask in person the worst that can happen is you get a no ,,If you approach with a letter you are sending alarm bell's to the owner ,,Greed kick's in

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Offline GoldDigger1950
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2009, 03:15:17 pm »
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The first rule of requesting permission? Don't rock up the the owner with metal detector in hand.

There are lots of ways to get one's foot in the door. Begin by politely introducing yourself. A calling card would help here but be very careful of your wording. Name, phone number and a single line such as "Archaeological Researching" would be enough and would also pique the normal landowner's interest. Just imagine if you were in a casual discussion with an archaeologist; even an amateur, who wanted to discuss your land and its history with you. Pretty heady stuff for most folk. Avoid pictures on your card and always refer to it as what it is. A calling card as opposed to a business card. There's a difference.

After your introduction, explain your interest and make your pitch. Keep it simple. "You most likely already know this but your land on Four Corners Road was once a camping place for troops moving between the towns of Hope and Despair. I was wondering if you'd allow me to document some of the items they may have left behind. I'd be very happy to show you the finds and even leave some with you as a momento of the history of your land. I promise to leave little evidence of my presence there. You're also welcome to tag along and watch."

Most folk won't tag along but welcome those who do. The occasional loss of a piece of history won't matter in the grand scheme of things and will be invaluable as a reference. Imagine the conversation with neighbors after you give a nice find to a "watcher" who tags along. "This guy was terrific! I followed him for a while and when he found this here silver coin, he gave it to me! And he covered every hole he dug! Nice fellow. You know what, I have his card here . . ." You can't pay for a referral like that one.

Some people have trouble making the acquaintance of others and moving into the area of property. That's understandable so your approach should focus on the history of the land as if it's more important than the land itself. Keep a clipboard at your side and write down the location of any significant finds. Keep a plastic bucket handy to put the junk in and never miss the chance to show your growing pile of "dangerous, rusty, sharp things" you are removing for the landowner. That bucket can represent a lot of good will.

There are lots of contract forms out there for detector find sharing and written permission can give you a lot of leeway should you be approached by passing neighbors or law enforcement who may believe you are a trespasser. When you ask for the written permission, explain that the landowner may not always be available and you want to be sure that you are covered for that possible approach by well meaning friends and officials. Make your find sharing area obvious but limit it to a check mark with a line next to it for defining a percentage but nothing else. It may be that the landowner will gloss over it and simply sign the paper.

Good luck with your next approach. Every time you get a yes means you should begin working hard for your next "yes" which may be a referral.

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« Last Edit: June 09, 2009, 03:20:36 pm by GoldDigger1950 »
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It's all about that moment when metal that hasn't seen the light of day for generations frees itself from the soil and presents itself to me.
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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2009, 10:48:00 pm »
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Larry,

this topic was very well said by GolDigger 1950.

In my experience here in N.M. goes like this:  I hunt meteorites and other artifacts on almost 90 % private land.  I have been given permission by several land owners by simply explaining what I am looking for.  I do spend some time educating them on what ever artifacts or meteorites I might be detecting for in any given area.  one of the biggest concerns I ALWAYS emphasize is the fact that I will definitely cover my holes and assure them that with at least one or two good rains you will not be able to tell I was ever there hunting.  I also tell them I will pick up any trash and show them what I have found at the end of my hunt be it treasures or trash.

That of course is not to say that I have ever been told " no, you cannot hunt here because to many people especially from out of state simply do not CARE or respect our properties.  They leave the most common plastic water bottles, mres, and trash of all sorts to include card board boxes such as Kelley Co metal detecting.

The other problem here is many many hunters who blatantly trespass onto others property without permission by crossing fence after fence.  One went so far as to get caught hunting in a GRAVEYARD!

Now to mention the many uncovered  holes left by hunters who just don't give a shite!!  When I am out hunting all you will see is my footsteps where I have been!  Respect not only for the landowner and our forests is a must!!  By doing this on a 100% constant basis will definitely make it a reality to hunt a lot of areas which would other wise be unapproachable.  Respect and sticking to your word goes a heck of a long way!  Just my two cents.

Ironman



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Those who say it cannot be done.....
should not interrupt the person doing it!

You will never find Treasure.....
unless you hunt for it!

Offline LaryTopic starter
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2009, 06:10:14 am »
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Thanks;
I sometimes get these ideas that I'm glad I don't act on before I get input.  25 years ago it was a different story!  I see that the slow single approach will get better results than a mass mailing. I appreciate your reply.

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« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2009, 06:13:49 am »
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Ionman;
I can tell by my first tries in my back yard that I need a little more practice hiding my dig.  I can't say I was really trying but I see how important the practice is.  The stuff one can read on this site are invaluable.  I can't wait to go to some of the sites I'm researching.

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Offline ivan salis
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2009, 09:00:32 pm »
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never be afraid to politely ask --- worse case "no" -- and if you don't ask anyone --the answer will always be "no" 100 % of the time ---so by asking you can only do better and you can not do any worse since 100% no from not asking is as bad as it can get --- so its all "upside" by asking --plus you then know which spots to focus your "research efforts on" --the ones you can hunt!! --why research a place thats "off limits"? waste of time and effort

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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2009, 09:44:59 pm »
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Ivan, lots of good wisdom in that post. Often, I've asked, expecting to hear a no, and was pleasantly surprised. On the flip side, I've anticipated a yes before and didn't get it. Just never know unless you ask. Sue

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Offline LaryTopic starter
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« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2009, 03:32:41 am »
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Ivan;
Although I was looking at an "off limits" area in my town, I was looking at it from a satilite picture with GIS information infromation about the city surrounding superimposed on it (street names, property lines, addresses, etc.) I haven't taken all the advice to get to the old parts of town lightly and this area is where the city first started.  It's funny, but when I first got excited about this and tried to come up with old places to go my mind drew a complete blank.  But after reading a bunch of the posts on this site I started looking at things slightly different. I looked up while sitting in my living room one evening, BING! We have a drawing that an architecture student did of my in-laws old farm house outside of town.  It burned down years ago and they don't own it any more but a friend of the family bought the property.  I  have his phone number and hope to get permission to hunt the property. I just ordered my first detector and it's on its' way.  I hope to make this one of my first searches. I love this stuff!

Thanks to all who take the time to share thier experience!

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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2009, 12:17:51 pm »
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Couldn't say it any better than the previous posts, actually I learned alot by reading them  Smiley Just put yourself in the landowners position. If it was your land and someone wanted to detect it would you be more willing to give permission to someone you didn't know and just left a flyer on your doorstep, who for all you know could be a weirdo, or someone who took the time to introduce himself/herself and came of as warm and friendly and not a threat to your property or family.

Good luck and I can't wait to hear about your finds!

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