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Offline hardluckTopic starter
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« on: May 10, 2010, 05:51:38 am »
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Hello All

Here is some thing that might interest all those interested in the Templar mysteries. There is a cave on Royston in England that allegedly has Templar carvings.

The cave has a cylindrical lower part about 17 feet (5.2 m) diameter and 10 feet (3 m) high decorated with low relief carvings of medieval appearance some of which were originally coloured.

At floor level there is a raised octagonal step surrounding the floor about 8 inches (20 cm) high. The upper part is bell shaped, making the total height of the cave 25 feet 6 in (7.7 m). Between the two parts, for most of the circumference there is a frieze marked in a diamond fashion and the diameter above this is 18 feet (5.5 m).

 The upper part also contains the original north entrance and the east shaft. The shape of the cave is thought to be modelled on the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.

Early visitors to the cave came down the original (north) entrance with the help of ladders but in 1790 the present entrance was made by the owner of what was then called the Town House on the opposite, north side, of Melbourn Street. He was a bricklayer by the name of Thomas Watson and in the cold winter of 1790 there was nothing for his men to do. They were set to work cutting the 72 feet (22 m) long tunnel between the Town House and the only place in the cave wall not covered with carvings.

Mr. Watson was able to charge 6 pence for each visit, an appreciable sum in those days. He also effectively took over the cave and ever since then cave and house have been in common ownership as "The Cave House and Estate".

In 1964 the Cave, Grade 1 listed by English Heritage, was leased from the then owners by Royston Town Council who installed the railings and lighting. Volunteer members of the Royston and District Local History Society act as guides at weekends during the summer months. The Society monitored humidity and Temperature for a full year and found that the humidity was always high and the temperature steady at 10?C (50?F).

Examination of the structure of the Cave indicates that there is evidence that there was a wooden part-floor just above the frieze. What may be beam slots can be seen under the entrance and in the diagonally opposite part of the wall. An investigation of part of the floor in 1976 found a post slot, which might have supported the floor above. It has been suggested that the structure was a star shaped platform supported on four posts held in position by struts wedged between the platform and the cave wall.

Such a structure would have given access to the line of large niches at a level about 13 feet (4 m) above the cave floor. These niches were clearly intended for storage but for what there can be no certainty. Around the base of the cave there is a raised octagonal step, badly worn in places at the time before the railings which follow the line of the octagon, were fitted.

The step, which is about 8 inches (20 cm) deep and too low for sitting, was probably used for kneeling while contemplating the carvings. A raised step of this type is common to round churches of the Templar period, such as the Temple Church in London or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (the Round Church) in Cambridge.


is it true or a late Medieval fake to attract tourists I do not Know?

Hardluck  Huh?

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Offline seldom
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2010, 06:13:19 am »
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That is good reading Thanks Hardluck

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Offline Paul A
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2010, 06:28:17 am »
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Hi!
Been there many times, it's about ten miles from me.
Sure is a weird place.
2 miles away from where I'm sitting is the site of "Temple Dinsley" where the Templars reputedly buried their treasure before being arrested and tortured.
Lots of local legends, no one has found it yet though!


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Offline hardluckTopic starter
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2010, 06:44:44 am »
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Hello Paul A

I have vaguely heard of that intriguing story. Do you know more details of the Temple Dinsley treasure story?

I  am sure many on this forum would be interested in reading it.

Hardluck.  Smiley

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Offline Paul A
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2010, 07:00:52 am »
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Hi,
Here's a link for Temple Dinsley...

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http://www.mysterychronicles.com/viewpost_332870.asp


Here's a second, even more interesting.
It mentions the building which now stands where Temple Dinsley was (Princess Helena College - a girls school).
What is even more interesting is that they mention "Nothing much has been found except a few skeletons and a chalice"  Shocked Shocked
About that "Chalice"....... I can't find any mention (or anyone locally!) who knows what ever happened to it!  Shocked

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/myths_legends/england/beds_herts_bucks/article_1.shtml


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« Last Edit: May 10, 2010, 07:18:32 am by Paul A »
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2010, 08:22:35 am »
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Hi HardLuck,   Wink

Thanks, it's good to write this post, I knew this place because I read an article about it somewhere in the past. In the frescoes, symbols "Templars" are not really represented, it is obviously clear that many Templars fled before and after the dissolution of the order to England, remains to be seen whether this statement hoax or not, which have left at this type of engraving and why?


Regards

Luc

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Lucky Luc

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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2010, 08:49:26 am »
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Excellent stuff guys, amazing place!  Smiley thanks for sharing it

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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2010, 03:03:52 pm »
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yes great stuff and thanks for sharing

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Xavier


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So many questions so little time

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« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2010, 04:14:30 am »
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Hello All

Thanks Paul A for the interesting links.

I suspect that the cave is not a Templar site but a site created in the mid 18th century. Perhaps a mason initiation site. It was allegedly rediscovered in 1742. A the time these secret clubs and societies became very popular. The Masons created their beliefs system on what they believed of the Templar traditions.

If you look on the second image I posted you will see a group of figure with head dresses that appear to be very similar to hair style of 18th century. Over time the site became a tourist attraction and we have what we see today.

Still an interesting place to visit.

Hardluck.



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« Last Edit: May 11, 2010, 04:19:46 am by hardluck »
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« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2010, 07:02:38 am »
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Someone needs to do some homework on that chalice.

Peace

Sean

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