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Offline Alan HassellTopic starter
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« on: November 25, 2009, 07:09:46 pm »
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THE LURE OF PIRATE TREASURE

By Alan Hassell ? Copyright 09/04/98

All rights reserved.

Queenscilff is a seaside holiday resort situated near the head of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. One of the attractions it offers the public is the lure of Pirate treasure. According to local legend, the pirate Benito Bonito, entered Port Phillip Bay sometime in 1821 and concealed in a cave a treasure known as the Lost Loot of Lima. After doing so, he ventured out of the heads to continue his evil trade.
Waiting for him outside was a British Man-O-War, which gave chase and eventually stormed Bonito's ship. Following a DrumHead trial, Bonito was allegedly hanged at sea. The only crew member to escape was a cabin boy who had a map tattooed on his arm. Such is the attraction of this treasure; many expeditions and syndicates have sought the treasure spending thousands of dollars in the process, without recovering a single Spanish piece of eight.
The 'Loot of Lima' is one of the most sought after treasures and probably one of the most documented. Researchers, Historians, and authors all agree on one point that the so-called treasure is buried on a tiny island in the Pacific known as Coco's Island. Coco's Island lies in Latitude 5 32' 57'' North, Longitude 87 2' 10'' West, about 550 miles due west of Panama City. It is sometimes confused with Coco's Keeling Islands.
It became the perfect hideout and haunt of pirates dating the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries. Off the main shipping lanes, but still close enough to the rich Spanish colonies situated along the Coastline, it was strategically well situated to the pirates needs. Coco's offered safe anchorage and a plentiful supply of fresh water and coconuts from which the pirates brewed alcoholic beverages. Deposits of loot on Coco's are associated with notorious names such as William Dampier, Edward Davis, Benito Bonito, Captain Thompson and some stories have it that even Captain Kidd buried his loot there too.
During a Trans Atlantic voyage a man named William Thompson, became friendly with another seaman John Keeting. One night, Thompson confided to Keeting and told the following story. In 1890, he had been at anchor in the British Brig 'Mary Dear' in the Port of Callao. Chile and Peru were at war; the Chilean army was about to attack the City of Lima.
The Spanish has accumulated great wealth and riches at Lima. The largest collection being held in the Cathedral of Lima. Amongst the collection of gold and silver artefacts, mostly encrusted with precious stones, was a life-size effigy of the Virgin Mary holding the divine child, reputedly made of solid gold and encrusted with jewels.
The Spanish had gathered their riches together and transported them to Callao only to find the only ship in the harbour was the 'Mary Dear.' Thompson was trusted by the Spanish because of prior dealing with them in the past. He was commissioned to cruise off the coast for several weeks.
Should Lima survive, he was to return the treasure to the Spanish Authorities in Panama. The treasure was loaded onto the 'Mary Dear' together with six soldiers and two priests to guard it during the coming voyage. Thompson and his crew were overwhelmed at the value of the cargo they had stored in the holds of their ship and this immense fortune proved to be too great a temptation for him. Once they left port for the open sea, they waited until the guards and priest were asleep, then took the advantage of murdering them all and disposed of their bodies over the side of the ship.
Thompson then set sail for Coco's Island and anchored in Chatham Bay. Two Bays, Chatham and Wafer Bay offer safe anchorage in the North of the island and both offer fresh water springs. There is also a smaller inlet in the South of the island called Bay of Hope where a landing could have easily been made.
Thompson unloaded the 'Mary Dear' and his treasure in a cave in Chatham Bay goes one story, but in another he made an inventory which reads as follows. 'We have buried at a depth of four feet in the red earth: alter trimmings of cloth of gold with baldachin, monstances, chalices, comprising 1,244 stones; 1 chest; two reliquaries weighing 120 pounds, with 624 topazes, carnelian's and emeralds, 12 diamonds; 1 chest; 3 reliquaries of cast metal weighing 160 pounds, with 860 rubies and various stones, 19 diamonds; 1 chest; 4,000 doubloons of Spain marked 8, 5,000 crowns of Mexico, 124 swords, 64 dirks, 120 shoulder belts, 28 rondaches (small shields); 1 chest; 8 caskets of cedar wood and silver with 3,840 cut stones, rings, platens and 4,265 uncut stones; 28 feet to the north-east at a depth of eight feet in the yellow sand; 7 chests with 22 candelabra in gold and silver, weighing 250 pounds, and 164 rubies, 12 armspans west; at a depth of 12 feet in the red earth.
The seven foot Virgin of gold with the child of Jesus and her crown and pectoral of 780 pounds, rolled in her gold chasuble on which are 1.684 jewels. Three of these are four-inch emeralds on the pectoral and six are six-inch topazes on the crown. The seven crosses are of diamonds.''Having hidden his treasures and shared out several chests of gold with his crew.
He left the island and was sighted by the Spanish Frigate 'Espsigle' which engaged and captured them. The Spanish on finding some of the 'Loot of Lima' on board hanged the crew sparing only Thompson and another man on condition they disclose the hiding place.
Returning to the island they were able to break away from the Spanish guards and took cover in the dense overgrowth. After they spent a week searching for them, the Spaniards finally gave up and sailed away. Some time later a passing whaling ship called into the island for water and found Thompson and the other man who died shortly after from a fever. Thompsons mate's name in some reports was Benito Bonito, in others it was a man named chapelle.
After his rescue from Coco's island, Thompson returned to the sea as a seaman, where he met Keating. Keating claimed Thompson gave him documents, maps and other information to recover the treasure concealed on the island. Since 1860 Coco's Island has been known chiefly as a treasure-hunting site.
It appears that the 'Loot of Lima' as it is called lies not in Queenscilff as claimed by local residents, but on an island many miles away. Sir Captain John Williams who salvaged the Niagra became involved in Benito's treasure when he was commissioned to dive at the scene in hope of recovering the virgin's effigy. During an interview I conducted with him, he stated the individuals involved were a weird bunch. He agreed to accept the deal on condition he was paid in advance.
He was told that there was an underwater cave with a ledge inside with the statue of the Virgin Mary resting there. Everything was as it was described to his diver's except there was no virgin to be found. After which he was accused of cheating the syndicate he had done the work for.
Historians believe a shadowy figure of a man known as Benito Bonito did exist, although they believe this name was used to disguise his real identity. It is agreed that the true identity of Benito Bonito was Captain Bennett Grahame, a British naval officer who had served with none other than Lord Nelson. In 1818 Grahame was sent to the Pacific in command of H.M.S. Devonshire to survey the coast between Cape Horn and Panama.
Grahame soon tired of his mundane task and instead turned to piracy, his crew was given the option to join him or be put ashore in Panama. Those that would not join him were instead taken to Coco's island where after being put ashore were slaughtered by Grahame and his crew. Thus he became know as Benito Bonito of the Bloody Sword. Treasure hunters, searching for the treasure years later uncovered a number of skeletons; these remains are believed to be members of Grahame's crew.
Apart from plundering richly laden Spanish vessels carrying cargoes of gold and silver Bonito also came ashore at a spot near Acapulco, Mexico where he seized a rich cargo of gold. According to reports he took it to Coco's island and buried it in Wafer Bay. One story tells of an occasion when Bonito spotted five Spanish ships, 3 of them being men-o-war and the other galleons laden with gold and silver. Bonito successfully engaged the Spanish in a running duel capturing the Latin ships. During the battle, 'Devonshire was extensively damaged and Bonito decided to load his treasure on a Spanish ship,'Relampago', which he sailed to Coco's and buried his treasure in a tunnel some 35 feet long.
Bonito's activities were common knowledge and complaints had been made to the British Admiralty, which despatched a warship to deal with him. However Bonito engaged the man-o-war and defeated it. Eventually he was cornered in the Bay of Buena Ventura after his ship had been sunk. Bonito and his crew were taken to England where they were tried convicted and hanged.
Several crew members were transported to Tasmania for life. Amongst them, a young girl named Mary Welch or Welsh told a dramatic story. She claimed Bonito's real name was Grahame who had picked her up in Panama several years earlier. It was Mary who started the Queenscilff version of the treasure tale.
She claimed the pirates came ashore at Queenscilff, buried the treasure in a cave and dynamited the entrance. Shortly after passing through the heads, they were spotted by a warship, which gave chase. After a running battle they were captured but Bonito blew his brains out on the deck rather than face the gallows.
The amazing part of her story is that after she married and secured her release instead of hunting for the treasure in the Queenscilff area, she sailed off to San Francisco where she raised an expedition to go to Coco's Island. The maps and documents she had in her possession proved worthless, many historians believe her tale to be nothing more than a fabrication of the imagination. Kenneth W. Byron wrote a book entitled, 'Lost treasures in Australia and New Zealand.' In it he describes investigations made by Harry Riesberg, who visited the Cathedral at Lima.
He found that at no time was there a war between Chile and Peru. He was astounded when a priest pointed to a life-size effigy of the Virgin Mary, and also discovered that at no time had the Cathedral been plundered. The British Admiralty has no records regarding the capture of Benito Bonito, his trial, execution or even the transportation of prisoners to Tasmania. Treasure and the thought of instant wealth and riches are sufficient excuse for wealthy individuals to indulge themselves in making a quick profit, especially if the story, documentation and maps appear to be authentic and credible. Anyone owning such information in those hard times where some individuals begged for a living were assured of living well at the expense of others.
Today, people are still being taken in by individuals with a good treasure tale; the only difference is that we now know these people as con-artists. The Coco's Islands has attracted many famous individuals to its shores seeking the Lost Loot of Lima. Little has ever been recorded as being found one individual lived on the island for many years with little to show for his efforts. It was reported at one time that the United States Army went in with heavy equipment including bulldozers and found nothing. Writers on the other hand find the tale a fascinating one in which they will always find a ready market for the tale they wrote about the so-called treasure.
However, time, effort and money often spent gathering the information outweighs any remittance they might recover from such a venture. Treasure tales, are at the end of the day, fairy tales for big boys who never grew up. The only difference between men and boys, is the price of their toys ?
Happy Hunting  Wise

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Offline salvor6
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2009, 02:45:39 am »
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Thanks Alan. I was thinking about financing an expedition to Cocos to search for the "Loot of Lima." You saved me a lot of money!

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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2009, 12:33:16 am »
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Hello Salvor6

Please read some of my earlier postings on Cocos threads that may be of help in understanding the complexity of the stories. Do not be too quick to come to any conclusions with the Cocos Legends. There are some real treasure stories behind the legends. Working out what is true and what is not is no easy task.

Sadly searching Cocos For treasure is no more as UNESCO has made it a world heritage site and what treasures are left are most likely now buried there for all time. However if you just want to experience the place as a tourist then go for it as it an amazing haunting island.



Hello Allan

First of all thank you and your associates for presenting your theoretical research on the Dark ages History of Britain. It has been very refreshing your theories about the history of Wales. Personally I cannot conclude either way because I have not researched your subject in depth. I must admit it I would be a little bias towards that little country of my birth. It is little irritating when some times Wales is forgotten when the countries of the British Isles are mentioned.

It is a bit like Tasmania being left of the map of Australia or Alaska and Hawaii forgotten when showing a map of the United States? Not a big deal for those who are not excluded but a little insulting for those who are. Archeologists have been cultivated through an education system that cultivates exclusionism.

The system works as such. You study for a degree under the instruction of a professor who teaches a set of beliefs imposed on him in same way. You follow the doctrine and write your conclusions that do not contradict the professor?s belief system and you pass. You become a so called enlightened person of Archeology as a person of science.

Indoctrinated to follow a belief system that in no way challenges the status quo. So when somebody challenges their theory, you are an indoctrinated intellectual now so you not to step out of line to commit professional suicide. So they dismiss everyone else without looking at the evidence they present. As workings of the lunatic fringe or conspiracy theorists!

It is for all of us all too easy to look at small proportion of evidence and come to a very narrow minded conclusion. As I have read your comments about Benito Bonito and other Cocos island legends etc has forced me to reply.

In some respects I agree with your assumptions about Australian Queens cliff loot of Lima story, Mary Welch a host of curious and interesting characters and to a lesser degree the whole Benito story. They are part of shyster era that saw a chance to make a quick buck. However it is all a little to presumptuous to write off the Cocos Treasure Legends entirely.


You once impressed me with your similar thoughts on narrow mindedness and yet you are just as guilty as the archeologists and the negative people you yourself have condemned.  It is clear that you have read Robert Nesmith books and Kenneth Byron?s book in which I have all of their books and both are admired as some of the better more accurate treasure authors of the 20th century. But both of these esteemed authors are guilty of errors just as anyone else.

First Robert Nesmith went to Lima to find out if the Cathedral of Lima was robbed? What makes you think the so called Loot of Lima ever came from there at all? That is the of course the legend we here today what countless authors have plagiarized for the last 100 years or so. If you have done any sort of in depth research you would have known that.

Stanley Fordham of the British Foreign Office made and Inquiry at the turn of the last century to see if there were any reports of any ships fleeing Lima. He inquired at the Lima National Library and discovered there was no record of any ships at all. What Stanley did not know or said that all the Peruvian colonial archives were sold off after the Pacific War in 1870  because the country was bankrupt?

 So Robert Nesmith's conclusions from the above research were that the Coco?s Island events never happened at all. What Nesmith does not say in his book that the Peruvian Shipping records or late consular and vice royalty records are not in Peru? So how could he ever confirm his conclusion that the events never happened?

Kenneth of course came to the same conclusion because he had read Nesmith?s rather fragmentary and fatally flawed research on the subject and took it on face value. It is one of dangers of research to rely on some things taken on face value.

So Allan my adventurous friend when you made the comments so many years ago that pirate stories are for big boys who never grow up then perhaps it can be also said about people who research Camelot and King Arthur is it not?

The very thing you yourself have preached about in numerous postings of the lack of interest and shortsightedness only to make conclusions and negative comments about a subject with out doing the clinical objective research to sort the facts from fiction.

There is and I will always state much fiction in the Cocos legends we hear today as you yourself could concur with me about King Arthur?  But if you really care to look you will find the real amazing treasure story behind all the smoke and mirrors.

May you find those treasures you seek?

Hardluck.
 


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Offline Alan HassellTopic starter
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2009, 10:28:05 am »
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Hi Hardluck,
Thanks for you comments they are appreciated although I dated this as being written in 1998 thats a bit of a mistake because I left Australia in 1994 to do my research on The King Arthur Kingdom but had several visits to the UK going back to 1986.
In actual fact Im not sure when I wrote the article or when it was published in Australian Gold Gem and Treasure Hunter.

At that particular time I was being pressured by Don Mahoney owner of G & T to produce more and more articles. I researched the subject as best I could at the time following an interview with the guy who recovered the Niagras gold who was asked to dive at Queenscliff to help recover a supposedly golden statue of the virgin mary from memory.

In those days one had to keep articles to a maximum of between 1000 and 2000 words theres only so much you can put into any article at the time.  Not only that I was also under pressure to still produce test reports of detectors and field trip experiences.
You can only do so much in the time you allot to any project in those days.

Most of my early writing were in fact written as appetite wheteners design to spur other on if you like its impossible to get ever aspect of what went on in those times.  You can only do the best and write to the best of your capability at the time.  No one is perfect and sometimes its possible to get it wrong too.  I decided to put this up on to the forum hoping that it would of of some use to anyone interested in the Coco's personally Im not My interests now are with a certain Comet hehe maybe next month it might be something else thats life..   Oh and you dont have to agree with everything I write that again is entirely up to the reader.  However there are other people who follow Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett with great interest I just add a few things that people are entitled to know about whether they are interested or not.  regards alan

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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2009, 04:12:02 pm »
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Hello Allan

Your comments are duly noted, and I can sympathize with anyone who even attempts to write about the Cocos enigma because I too cannot count the number of times I had to re-research parts of the story to understand it.

The only way to begin to understand the history surrounding the legends was to collect every scrap of documents,Maps, personal letters, dispatches, shipping records, journals, bill of laden, Vice royalty reports newspaper reports etc...

20 years and 42 countries later I and my associates have about 15000 pages of documents relating to the subject dating from 1532 to present day. For us it has been a vast labor of love. The greatest treasure of all I believe is the chance to tell the real treasure stories behind the legends.

And perhaps in the near future I and my colleagues will be able to tell that story.

Allan do you mind if I move this thread to Cocos island treasure in treasure legends?

I have been very interested in seeing if there is still any interest level in this subject as a research tool

Regards Hardluck.


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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2009, 05:22:22 pm »
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Hi Hardluck well after 20 odd years reasearching the same subject you yourself probably know how frustrating it can be when you are led up the garden path with a load of phoney misleading information that have been place there by wannabee writers trying to make a name for themselves and of course the English Establishment.

Research is not easy and the Sutton Hooo treasure was one of the most challenging ones because no matter how hard and long I look at it I was unable to disprove what the Establishment and Academics had already stated as fact.
It really wasn never my intention to discredit anyone in particular but once the jigsaw started to come together more pieces of the puzzle started to appear. They were a result of the many hours I had spent reading and researching Ancient British History that the pieces started to fit into place and the truth could be realised and told.
Eventually you will find that missing link the starting point of any puzzle, if you do things may start falling into place for you too.
I hope you manage to get a result from your investigations and good luck to you.

No, I have no objections to you moving this to the cocos island thread but feel it would be lost amongst all the other material there unles you incluse as a new topic as it is on here.

Anyway good luck in your research  alan

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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2009, 08:24:05 am »
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Hello Alan

I am all too familiar with that path. I have contacted many people who claimed they were related to certain characters in the history of Cocos. Most were wishful thinking but some were actually linked by being descendants of people related to the story without evening knowing it.

Cocos became a magnet for attention seekers, con artists and would be treasure hunters. Any in depth study in the late 19th and 20 century treasure hunts reveals a host of amazing inept ill researched expeditions that even before they started, about 400 at last count.

Because of these claims and counter claims over the years which is still going on from time to time, there was one outlandish claim by a British stock Trader this year just recently. And the Alex Capris 2008 documentary that was a complete flight into fantasy. Because of the many claims academics and historians treat the subject as folly and the subject is confined to the too hard basket. So they have condemned all the stories about Cocos as mere legend.

What amazed me and my colleagues until we started researching is that no serious research has ever been done on the subject. It has been our intention from the start to follow the leads to prove or disprove the Legend with out any preconceived beliefs of the validity of the story. And with this obsession to uncover the truth we discovered the real events that spawned into legends we hear today.

Sadly the legend will perhaps always be stronger than the the real story because the myth has had over a hundred and fifty years to become so ingrained into popular imagination.  It is very hard to break the grip the legend has on the real historical events.

It is perhaps some thing that some researchers here would be facing themselves in their own projects.

Hardluck  Wink

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« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2010, 05:43:25 am »
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 :oThanks for the great article. I only came across this site by accident while trying to find information on Benito Bonito since I live not too far from Queenscliff. I enjoy a bit of fishing off the pier down there and the myth has always intrigued me as I enjoy a bit of scuba diving also. It was exciting to find some real information on the subject as so much myth becomes fact. Your article got me here in the first place and I intend on staying and being a regular reader. Thank you for helping me find such an interesting site.   Clapp

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« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2010, 07:03:24 am »
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Hello Bonito

 Welcome

It is a nice part of the world your in, down there near swan bay. It has been a bit of a local legend down there with the Benito story.

Sadly legends some times turn out to be just legends.

And yet it is interesting how it came about to have the Benito myth down in swan bay queens cliff area?

The story came out of a newspaper story with alleging certain information that led a syndicate of 4 men to a location in Queens cliff. This lead to shafts being dug that eventually lead to quarrels and was soon abandoned. Others came and went, why?  Because all failed the cardinal rule of treasure hunting.

Research and research some more.

You may get some better insight of the story by ken Byron's Book lost treasures of Australia and New Zealand.

I know much more interesting treasure leads down that way.

Hardluck  Wink

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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2010, 05:31:23 pm »
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Awesome story guys...it's the kind of stories that keep me awake at night lol

 Grin Grin Grin

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