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Offline DavidTopic starter
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« on: April 07, 2009, 05:26:43 pm »
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David Villanueva, the author of several metal detecting titles, has discovered that digital cameras can be easily adapted to reveal the location of buried treasure from up to several hundred yards away. In his latest publication, The Successful Treasure Hunter?s Secret Manual: Discovering Treasure Auras in the Digital Age, David explains clearly how anyone can turn a digital camera (possibly one they already own) into an amazing treasure hunting tool.
 
Having successfully used a Polaroid camera for photographing auras given off by buried metal for a number of years, David was horrified when Polaroid stopped making the film in 2005 and usable original film quickly became unavailable at any price.  In the short-term alternative film is available, which photographs treasure auras at least as well as the original film but Polaroid?s recent decision to cease all instant film production would make photographing treasure auras history?unless digital cameras could be used.

However, digital camera technology is very different to that of film cameras and what worked with Polaroid failed with digital.  A complete re-think was needed!  The breakthrough came after David learned of treasure hunters successfully using a highly specialised digital camera to locate caches buried along Spanish mule-train trails.  So clearly it was possible to photograph auras digitally but could it be done without spending a fortune on high-tech equipment?   After three years of intensive research the answer is absolutely yes!  Some, possibly many, popular digital cameras are up to the task.

Using readily available photographic accessories that anyone can easily attach, without causing damage, the digital cameras tested were able to record an aura, from a distance, on a single quarter-ounce (seven-gram) gold sovereign coin buried six inches (150mm) underground.  In extensive field trials cameras located buried metal over two feet (610mm) deep and could discriminate between different metals.  The cameras could be hand-held or tripod-mounted and could capture auras anytime during daylight hours in a wide range of weather conditions.  A colleague invited to test the system, with his own camera, clearly demonstrated that no special skill or ability was necessary by obtaining an aura on the first attempt.

After reading The Successful Treasure Hunter?s Secret Manual, well-known treasure hunter and author Stan Grist said: ?If this is for real, it will dramatically improve my treasure hunting results for the rest of my life! I am in the process of assembling all of the recommended gear so I can get out into the field as soon as possible. From a scientific perspective, my associates and I all agree that this may actually be the modern-day solution for a specific, huge treasure in Ecuador that we have been seeking for years. I am REALLY excited!?


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Offline Christian
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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2009, 06:26:24 pm »
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Hello David,

thank you for sharing this interesting article with us.

I remember having read about the Polaroid thing in an old Treasure Hunters Confidental issue, maybe 10 years ago. However I think it mentioned the requirement of a special film. I'm not sure if it is in production any longer and how well it really worked. Have you tried it?

Regards,

Christian

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« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2009, 10:31:12 pm »
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Many digital cameras have a infrared filter over the image sensor. If you remove it and replace it with a piece of exposed blank developed film, you can take near infrared photos. I did this with an older Vivitar digital camera and it worked very well.  Cool

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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 12:42:28 am »
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Thanks David...... How about telling us how it is done so that we may enjoy this technological breakthrough in treasure hunting? Cheesy

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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2009, 04:35:07 am »
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Hi David       
                 Yes this sounds exciting , Would always be interested in trying new ideas to find treasure .  I suppose the myth that goes back to the beginning of time for the Irish about( A Pot Of Gold ) at the end of the rainbow might very well be true .

                 If you want to share some of your technical info about the subject David we will be eager to look over your shoulder . "so to speak"  and experiment with the idea.

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Offline DavidTopic starter
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2009, 06:11:32 pm »
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Quote:Posted by Christian
Hello David,

thank you for sharing this interesting article with us.

I remember having read about the Polaroid thing in an old Treasure Hunters Confidental issue, maybe 10 years ago. However I think it mentioned the requirement of a special film. I'm not sure if it is in production any longer and how well it really worked. Have you tried it?

Regards,

Christian



Thanks Christian.  The Polaroid SX-70 SLR camera is the one recommended for photographing treasure auras.  And it does work - I found it invaluable in recovering a scattered cache of Iron Age gold coins.  The film used was SX-70/ Timezero film which ceased production in 2005, however 600 film is still available and can be easily made to fit and work in the camera.  600 film will also capture auras so the Polaroid SX-70 can be used for a few more years yet.

Best wishes,

David

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Offline DavidTopic starter
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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2009, 06:28:10 pm »
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Quote:Posted by oRo
Many digital cameras have a infrared filter over the image sensor. If you remove it and replace it with a piece of exposed blank developed film, you can take near infrared photos. I did this with an older Vivitar digital camera and it worked very well.  Cool


The false colour infrared photography that you get with this method is excellent for revealing underground features like walls and for compacted ground such as old trails.  Many digital cameras can be quickly and temporarly converted to false colour IR by attaching a suitable infrared filter to the outside of the lens.

Best wishes,

David

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« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2009, 11:29:12 pm »
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David could you post an example photo to  show us what to look for ?

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« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2009, 10:19:45 am »
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David could you tell us how to do this or post some images of the idea??

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« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2009, 12:23:52 pm »
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Quote:Posted by David
The false colour infrared photography that you get with this method is excellent for revealing underground features like walls and for compacted ground such as old trails.  Many digital cameras can be quickly and temporarly converted to false colour IR by attaching a suitable infrared filter to the outside of the lens.

Best wishes,

David


Yes that is why I did the conversion, also to find exposed bedrock on mountainsides. A technique is to observe a distant hillside just after a rain. When conditions are right the exposed bedrock will steam. This makes it easy to  spot it from a distance. With the converted camera the darker mineralized exposed rock areas are made known even through brush. This saves a lot of field work when looking for places to prospect. I have not seen examples of small detail using film, but did observe a prospector that had a very sensitive ion meter, military. Just after sunset it could easily find mineral enriched/nugget patches.

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