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Offline BitburgAggie_7377Topic starter
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« on: August 18, 2014, 03:00:45 pm »
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     Green Chili Stew is a dish that originated in New Mexico and Arizona among the Native American (Pueblo, Hopi, Navajo, Apache, and related tribes) people and the Hispanic settlers.    As a folk dish, there really is NO "official" version or recipe for the dish.   In it's most basic form, Green Chili Stew consist of roasted green chiles (preferably Hatch or other New Mexico varieties which tend to be hotter than more typical Anaheim varieties), water, and cubed meat (usually pork or mutton).  Most varieties also include onion  and/or garlic and cubed potatoes.

      Here is a BASIC GREEN CHILI STEW recipe (makes approximately 6 servings):

Ingredients:   2 medium onions, chopped.
                   8 garlic cloves
                   3 tablespoons vegetable oil
                   4.5 pounds of pork shoulder cut into 1-inch pieces
                   5 pounds of fresh or frozen roasted New Mexican green Chiles, thawed, peeled, seeded and chopped.
                   7 cups water
                   2 teaspoons salt
                   1.5 pounds boiling water

Preparation:   In a large kettle, cook the onions and the 6 of the garlic cloves, minced, in the oil until the onions are softened, add the pork, the chiles, the water, and the salt and simmer, uncovered for 1.5 hours, adding more water if necessary to keep the pork barely covered.   Stir in the potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces, making sure they are covered by the cooking liquid, stirring occasionally until the pork and the potatoes are tender (approximately 30 minutes).   Stir in the remaining 2 garlic cloves (minced) and salt to taste....simmer for 5 minutes.

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And here is MY version which has more complex layers of flavor (measurements are approximate as this is cooked by guess and by golly based on taste and appearance)

BA's GREEN CHILI STEW:

Ingredients:   Approximately 3 pounds of cubed pork
                   2 pounds of frozen New Mexico GREEN CHILES (Hatch preferred but not required) or 2 large cans (1lb 11oz) cans of whole Hatch Green Chiles.  (or for more variety use half frozen and half canned)
                   2 small cans diced fire roasted green chiles
                   6 to 8 fresh Anaheim variety peppers (preferably Hatch, Big Jim, or Slim Jim) but any Anaheims will do  (500 - 2,500 scoville units for standard Anaheim, 2,500-8,000 scoville units for New Mexico varieties)
                   2 or 3 medium to large fresh dark skinned Poblano peppers  (500 - 2,500 scoville units)
                   3 or 4 medium sized jalapeno peppers (generally the darker the skin, the hotter...and the more the pepper is turning from green to red, the hotter).   We want GREEN, but starting to turn color is ok.  Variety is a key to getting good flavor layers.  These run 2,500  - 8,000 scoville units0
                   A handful of Serrano peppers (10,000 - 23,000 scoville units).   I usually use about 3 of these, but they are good heat adjusters since they chop up fine enough to cook in easily no matter where in the process you add them.
                    1 large or (2 medium) yellow onion, chopped.
                    4 large cloves of garlic
                    1.5 lbs of boiling potatoes cut into pieces a little bit larger than the pork cubes.
                    2 bottles of beer, preferably a dark Mexican beer.
                    4 cups of water
                    2 or 3 tablespoons of lard or vegetable oil
                    salt, ground black pepper, and sufficient flour to lightly coat half of the cubed meat
                    

Preparation:   NOTE: WEAR RUBBER GLOVES WHEN HANDLING CHILIES.  DO NOT TOUCH YOUR EYES, NOSE, MOUTH or any other bodily part with hands that have been exposed to these chilies.
                  1)   finely chop you largest serrano pepper.
                        core, seed, and finely chop two jalapenos
                        mince 2 garlic cloves
                  2)   dredge 1/2 of your cubed meat in the flour/black pepper/salt mixture
                  3)   heat the lard or vegetable oil in the bottom of a stock pot
                  4)   sautee 1/2 of the onion along with the peppers and garlic from step 1 in the stock pot.   When the onion starts to turn translucent, add in the cubed meat from step 2 and stir regularly until the meet is browned.
                  5)   add the two bottles of beer and set temperature to a high simmer
                  6)   core and seed the poblano peppers and the fresh anaheim peppers.  Remove the ribs and cut the flesh into strips approximately the size of your pinky or your ring finger.   Add the cut peppers to the stock pot as you proceed.   At some point during this process you will want to add your 4 cups of water.
                  7)   add the remaining cubed meat to pot
                  Cool   Coarsely chop your thawed frozen green chiles or your whole canned chiles and add to pot.  Most people prefer to seed the chiles, but it is not required.  If you are using the whole canned chiles, you can add the liquid from the can if you like---I usually do.
                  9)   Let simmer for a while (30 minutes to an hour) and add remaining onions and minced clove as well as one of the small cans of diced green chiles and a diced jalapeno or serrano pepper.  
                 10)  Add additional water or beer if desired and continue to simmer uncovered stirring occasionally, and taste testing as needed.   Add additional diced peppers (jalapeno, serrano, or the remaining can of diced green chiles) based on flavor and heat.
                  Total cooking time should ideally be between 2 and 3 hours, but if you can't resist the delicious smells, it will be ready to eat as soon as the pork, potatoes, and poblano pepper strips are all fork tender.

                 You can further modify this recipe by adding carrots and or corn (frequently served with pieces of corn on the cob cut into about 1 inch long sections added during the cooking).

BA
                  



                  


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« Last Edit: August 18, 2014, 04:04:09 pm by BitburgAggie_7377 »
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2014, 05:46:56 pm »
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7 pounds of Chilli's   Shocked   Ok But I'm Getting scared Now,

BA, are those the Hot Varity or are they a mild one to make up the main Body of the stew,,

I'm going to pick all this on Thursday and I might use the beer for this one or I might follow your Recipe to the Letter,

Thanks BA,  That is quite a Feast there.

AU

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Offline BitburgAggie_7377Topic starter
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« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2014, 06:01:55 pm »
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"BA, are those the Hot Varity or are they a mild one to make up the main Body of the stew,,"

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If you get the regular annaheims, they are pretty mild as are the Poblanos.    That's part of the reason I included the scoville units---the higher the number, the hotter the pepper.   I'd recommend using mild, flavorful peppers for the bulk of the ingredients, especially the first few times...that let's you dial up the heat by adding serranos and /jalapenos.   And since serranos and jalapenos are smaller than anaheim and poblano peppers it is easier to fine tune the heat buying adding them once you've got the base going well (except for the initial quantity that you sauteed).   Start by adding one or two of the hotter peppers and then waiting 15 to 20 minutes before you decide whether you need to add another (and if so whether it should be the hotter serrano or the milder jalapeno).   Remember the goal is flavor not flame.

BA

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« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2014, 06:08:36 pm »
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Quote:Posted by BitburgAggie_7377
"BA, are those the Hot Varity or are they a mild one to make up the main Body of the stew,,"

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If you get the regular annaheims, they are pretty mild as are the Poblanos.    That's part of the reason I included the scoville units---the higher the number, the hotter the pepper.   I'd recommend using mild, flavorful peppers for the bulk of the ingredients, especially the first few times...that let's you dial up the heat by adding serranos and /jalapenos.   And since serranos and jalapenos are smaller than anaheim and poblano peppers it is easier to fine tune the heat buying adding them once you've got the base going well (except for the initial quantity that you sauteed).   Start by adding one or two of the hotter peppers and then waiting 15 to 20 minutes before you decide whether you need to add another (and if so whether it should be the hotter serrano or the milder jalapeno).   Remember the goal is flavor not flame.

BA


Right  so I will Buy the Main Bulk Being Mild Chilli's and then work with the Hot ones as Required.

Shall I not bother peeling the hot chilli's as the soften up with cooking,

AU

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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2014, 07:04:15 pm »
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   I just do like Beef Stew,  Chuck Roast cut in 2" cubs cooked with Onions, Carrots, Garlic , Potatoes and what ever.    When about Half cooked I add about a Lb of Roasted Peeled Green Chili.  I like the Taste but not roast off the face.  Just before it's fully cooked add  more Green Chili so you have something to play with in the bowl that's not cooked down. 

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Offline BitburgAggie_7377Topic starter
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« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2014, 11:18:11 pm »
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"
Right  so I will Buy the Main Bulk Being Mild Chilli's and then work with the Hot ones as Required.

Shall I not bother peeling the hot chilli's as the soften up with cooking,

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Right.....I don't bother roasting and peeling the fresh chiles.   It adds another layer of complexity to the taste equation having the peeled frozen roasted chiles and the unpeeled whole.   The unpeeled will definitely cook long enough to be tender.

Also, if you want to add yet another layer of flavor, substitute chicken broth or stock for an equal amount of water.   Just remember that if you do that you will also increase the salt content.

BA

(And homies method would turn out a really good green chili stew also)

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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2014, 12:08:38 am »
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Great, Right I just got to find frozen Chilli's, I have never seen them here, All the other bits I can get close by so all good,

AU

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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2014, 01:38:19 am »
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 Shocked Surly you can use fresh chilli's ? To peal them just place in a plastic bag and seal, place in microwave oven for 30 sec or till you can see some condensation let cool and peal. 

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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2014, 05:50:15 am »
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Sounds good! Here's the one I like. 2-3 cans of beer,2-3 lbs of beef, goat, venison, chicken, turkey or any combination. 2 large onions, 2 bell peppers,1 tsp of cumin seed, pinch of oregano, 5-6 garlic cloves, salt and pepper, pinch of sage, a few red potatoes, 2-3 lbs of green chiles. Add carrots if you like. The day before you serve bring to a boil then simmer the meat cover in beer  for 3-4 hours. Leave meat in liquid solution (let it cool in refrigerator) till next day. Then shred meat in liquid, then add onions,  bell peppers, cumin, oregano, garlic cloves , salt and pepper, sage, green chiles and potatoes. Bring to boil then simmer for about a hour. Enjoy!

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« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2014, 05:59:28 am »
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Quote:Posted by xavier
Shocked Surly you can use fresh chilli's ? To peal them just place in a plastic bag and seal, place in microwave oven for 30 sec or till you can see some condensation let cool and peal. 


Thanks Mate, I did wonder how the Devil I was going to do that, My Kitchen Knife set are Like Razors, And 1 Slip and I'd Be A Shorthand Typist,

I seen em do the Capsicum /Peppers over a Flame But My stove is Electric which does make it tough,   Club

AU 

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