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Offline hardluckTopic starter
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« on: January 23, 2011, 01:57:47 pm »
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Hello All

Here is another version of the Tumacacori Mission treasure legend.

 In 1891, Judge William H. Barnes had a late night visitor, from a man that claimed he was a Spanish priest. He had found a treasure map, in a vault in his church in Spain and had traveled to Arizona to try to find this treasure. The map led the priest to Arizona. He asked the judge to help him find a few churchgoing men to help him find the treasure. He was searching for not only the treasure but also trustworthy helpers for his cause.

He and his group of men set off on their journey. The map led them to Tumacacori Mission, which is about 45 miles south of Tucson. One of the men in the party began digging and an undisclosed distance from the church?s altar. After only a few minutes of digging a small chamber was revealed. The priest descended down into the chamber and came back with several metal cases full of gold bullion.

 He asked the men if they would only help him take his found treasure to the Southern Pacific Railroad depot in Tucson, they could keep the remainder of the treasure. He was only interested in enough treasure to help feed the poor of this own parish back in Spain.

The group of men did help the priest and he returned to Spain with his found fortune. He left the priests at Saint Augustine Cathedral in Tucson a small donation before his departure.

The group of men could hardly wait until they could return to the Tumacacori Mission and bring home their own treasure; however, this was not in the cards for the assistants. It had only been a few days since they helped this mysterious priest, however, the landmarks were different, or they did not follow the directions exactly. They could not find the location!

Judge Barnes still was in possession of the map that the priest had given him and he tried to find the hidden treasure. The map is now only a memory and the hidden chamber along with the treasure has never been found.

Is this just another treasure yarn?

There has been many claims in regards to this legend. Some legends tell of lost mines around the mission and alluded that the Jesuits was working them in secret? And many unanswered questions

Was it Jesuit treasure or some thing else?

Was there any treasure to begin with?

And what can the history of the place tell us?

Hardluck


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Offline seldom
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« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2011, 02:19:58 pm »
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I have always looked at this one as being more legend/ yarn. To many questions like how could they not find it after only a few days/weeks.
On the other hand I do think that the Jesuit operated several mines in the area. Are they lost I don't think so I think they were work out by the Jesuit or later miners.
As for a treasure room Huh??? I can't say with out more info.

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Offline GoldDigger1950
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« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2011, 04:21:16 pm »
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I once found an old town site from 1640 in Connecticut. The foundations were there and I was amazed at what was laying about in their dump area. This was near an area that I spent many hours hiking as a teen and I knew the surrounds quite well. I went home at dusk and two weeks later, spent more than a day trying to relocate it with no success. I was about to write it off as my imagination when my dog ran off on the scent of something. I followed him and it was clear that he had found what I couldn't. This time, I blazed a trail back to my house so I could locate it again.

Years later, I went there with a metal detector and found a small cache of silver bars and even a small sand block with a cast piece of jewelry still inside. The block was long ago donated to the museum in Mystic along with the pendant that was in it. Clearly there was a silversmith at that location.

I can see how a site can be lost in just a few weeks of being away. In my case, I think the vegetation sort of hid any evidence of my being there a mere two weeks before.

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« Last Edit: January 23, 2011, 04:24:22 pm by GoldDigger1950 »
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Offline hardluckTopic starter
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2011, 04:20:06 am »
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Hello GD

Gee GD was would of been an interesting site to find dating back to 1640.

I  have found things by chance and lost them by coming back a few weeks later. Out in the thick scrub I cane across the remains of an old homestead made of sandstone. about 3 walls 2 windows with 2 fireplaces. An old Cob and Co coach rotten and half eaten out by termites and overgrown with bushes growing up through it. And a sand stone headstone dated about 1880, it was illegible in places, with a name of women who was murdered by her husband. To this day I have never been able to find again. The landscape can change very quickly.

The earliest account I have read about the possibility of treasure being near Tumacacori Mission was a story dated around 1863 that tells of a much earlier legend of a visit by Father Kino and a silver salt shaker presented to him by a local mine owner from a mine called the Salt shaker mine.

The old settlements of Huebabi, Tumacacori, Tubac, Tucsou, and San Francisco maintained a considerable population at the time, it seems smelting activities did take place in the area near the Mission. But the Mission we see today is not the Jesuit mission that the earlier legend tells of.

You can see that the Fr Kino map the region where Tumacacori once existed the areas of Jesuit influence. The mines were never worked by the priests but by Mexican miners themselves and perhaps smelting expertise was given to the early miners  by the Jesuits?

In which over time the Jesuits built up a hoard of silver themselves. Indian uprisings and expulsion of Jesuits could have created a possible treasure cache. In which the Jesuits after many years away from region return to claim some of this treasure?

Perhaps the events of the early 1890's created the modern day perception that the later Franciscan Mission was a hiding place of treasure. The belief was so much so that the old mission was nearly destroyed by would be treasure hunters in the early 20th century.

The region of course has its own fair share of lost mines just like any other region in that part of world.

I an not inclined to right off the legend altogether just yet, as it is just to me an amazing and interesting place.

And I am sure there some one out there can amaze me with some interesting documents.

Hardluck



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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2016, 11:45:24 pm »
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its been a while since someone posted butt.... we have been keeping this for over 10 years not. Coming from opata blood, we have an even different story including the distance from the church to where the treasure is. Although translation gets iffy... plus  secondary map in stone. one of 3 which surround the area. if anyone still wants to learn more gimme a shout out.

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