[x] Welcome at THunting.com!

A fun place to talk about Metal Detecting, Treasure Hunting & Prospecting. Here you can share finds and experience with thousands of members from all over the world

Join us and Register Now - Its FREE & EASY

THunting.com
Treasure Hunting & Metal Detecting Community
   
Advanced Search
*
Welcome, Guest! Please login or register HERE - It is FREE and easy.
Only registered users can post and view images on our message boards.

Login with email, password and session length
Or Login Using Social Network Account
News:
Pages:  1 2   Go Down
Print
Share this topic on FacebookShare this topic on Del.icio.usShare this topic on DiggShare this topic on RedditShare this topic on Twitter
Tags:
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Offline SimpsonTopic starter
Bronze Member
*

Join Date: Dec, 2008
Thank you0

Activity
0%

France
Posts: 172
Referrals: 0

1070.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards

XP Goldmaxx
« on: August 14, 2009, 05:47:03 am »
Go Up Go Down

The Village of Rennes le Chateau is associated with a famours Templar Treasure ... read on to learn more about it.


History of the Village

This predominantly rural area has a very rich history, as evidenced by its castles, cathedrals, vineyards and museums. Mountains frame both ends of the region - the Cevennes to the northeast and the Pyrenees to the south. Jagged ridges, deep river canyons and rocky limestone plateaus, with vast caves beneath, make it one of the most scenic spots on earth.

Over the centuries religious and political conflicts have caused much havoc in the area. The ruined castles which cling precariously to hilltops played a leading role in the struggles between the Catholic church and the Cathars at the beginning of the 13th century. Others guarded the volatile border with Spain. Whole communities were wiped out during the campaigns of the Catholic authorities to rid the area of the Cathar heretics during the Albigensian Crusades and later, when Protestants fought for religious freedom against the French monarchy.

Modern fame

The modern reputation of Rennes-le-Ch?teau rises from rumours dating from the mid-1950s and not from the lifetime of a local nineteenth century priest B?renger Sauni?re, who was alleged to have mysteriously acquired and spent large sums of money (despite the existence of much evidence proving the contrary). Published by French Editions Belisane from the early 1980s onwards, the evidence ranged from the archives in the possession of Antoine Captier, which includes Sauni?re's correspondence and notebooks, and the minutes of the ecumenical Trial between Sauni?re and his bishop between 1910-1911 which are located in the Carcassonne Bishopric. All of the evidence demonstrates that Sauni?re's source of wealth lay in the trafficking of masses: this is not "opinion", but historical fact, emphasised by French authors like Rene Descadeillas and Jean-Jacques Bedu. He was even said to have visited several heads of state, though there is no evidence for this whatsoever. These rumours were given wide local circulation in the 1950s by Noel Corbu, a local man who had opened a restaurant in Sauni?re's former estate who probably hoped to attract business. They moved from local to national importance when they were incorporated by Pierre Plantard into his mythology of the Priory of Sion, which influenced the authors of the popular 1982 book Holy Blood, Holy Grail.

From this point on Rennes-le-Ch?teau became the centre of conspiracy theories claiming that Sauni?re uncovered hidden treasure and/or secrets about the history of the Church that threatened the foundations of Catholicism. Since the mid-1950s, the area has become the focus of increasingly sensational claims involving the Knights Templar, the Priory of Sion, the Rex Deus, the Holy Grail, the treasures of the Temple of Solomon, the Ark of the Covenant, ley lines, geometric alignments, and others. Elements of these ideas were later incorporated into Umberto Eco's 1989 novel Foucault's Pendulum, Michael Baigent's, Henry Lincoln's and Richard Leigh's bestselling The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, Dan Brown's bestselling 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code (which borrows heavily from the Holy Blood, Holy Grail above), and the computer game Gabriel Knight III.

The village now attracts visitors who look for hidden treasures and evidence of conspiracy, much to the displeasure of the locals.

Sceptical views

Almost all historians reject these conspiracies as nothing more than fantasy. According to writers such as Paul Smith, Monsignor George Boyer in 1967 (Vicar General of the parish of Carcassonne), Rene Descadeillas, Jacques Rivi?re, Jean-Luc Chaumeil, Jean-Jacques Bedu, Vincianne Denis, Bill Putnam, John Edwin Wood, and Marie Francine Etchegoin - the stories of Sauni?re's "mysteries" were based on nothing more than a minor scandal involving the sale of masses, which eventually led to the disgrace of both Sauni?re and his bishop. His 'wealth' was short-lived and he died relatively poor. Other aspects of the Rennes-le-Ch?teau legend derive from forgeries created on behalf of Plantard.

From Wikipedia, the free encylopedia


Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg43618.html#msg43618



There are 5 attachment(s) in this post which you can not view or download

Please register for viewing them.

rennes1.jpg
rennes2.jpg
rennes3.jpg
rennes4.jpg
rennes5.jpg


Logged
Offline SimpsonTopic starter
Bronze Member
*

Join Date: Dec, 2008
Thank you0

Activity
0%

France
Posts: 172
Referrals: 0

1070.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards

XP Goldmaxx
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2009, 05:47:57 am »
Go Up Go Down

More pictures ...

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg43619.html#msg43619



There are 2 attachment(s) in this post which you can not view or download

Please register for viewing them.

rennes6.jpg
rennes7.jpg


Logged
Offline truthSeeker
Pull Tab
*

Join Date: Aug, 2009
Thank you0

Activity
0%

United States
Posts: 9
Referrals: 0

45.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2009, 02:55:24 am »
Go Up Go Down

Hi,

I wouldn't take too much notice of people like

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

Paul Smith
, etc, they all had or have their own agendas for trying to discredit the Rennes Mystery. Rene Descadeillas even searched for the treasure he believed Berenger Sauniere had found and hid in his domain, it was only when he didn't find it that he set out to say to debunk it.
People were looking for the treasure in 1925, a long time before the 1950's - 1970's when the mystery started to become better known.

I have just finished reading a book,

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

LOST TOMB OF THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
by Ben Hammott, who say's he solved the clues the priest is said to have hid in his church, these clues led him to discover a tomb with some treasure in. He hasn't managed to get inside yet until an excavation takes place with the French, but he has filmed it through a small shaft and has posted pictures on his website

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

www.benhammott.com
. He has lots of other interesting research about the mystery as well.

I really liked the book as it starts at the beginning when Hammott first heard about Rennes-le-Chateau, it then tells how he solved the clues to make his discoveries. It is a very funny book, Hammott's humor had me laughing out loud on many occasions. It's a treasure hunt I can recomend you all read, I think you will like it. It has over 300 images as well, yes that's right, over 300.

Another great book about the mystery that dosen't take its self too seriously is Rat Scabies and the Holy Grail, he dosen't find it but the journey is fun.

Truth Seeker

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg44033.html#msg44033




« Last Edit: August 16, 2009, 02:57:53 am by truthSeeker »
Logged
Offline Luc
Moderator
Silver Member
*****

Live it is a treasure to enrich the spirit
Join Date: Sep, 2009
Thank you8

Activity
36%
Male
France
Posts: 1162
Referrals: 0

3355.00 Gold
View Inventory

WWW Awards

Fisher F75, Tesoro Eldorado
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2009, 12:56:50 pm »
Go Up Go Down

In the story of Rennes le Chateau, there is aso another village P?rillos near Opoul

   
good reading
Luc

The three chapels of Perillos

Some anachronistic observations

{alt}The church that is now known as the church of St Michael, in Perillos, originally must have been the chapel of the castle of the lords of Perillos. Both are separated by only a few metres of what is now the church?s forecourt. We have already made a number of architectural observations underlining this likelihood. One question does remain: did, in medieval times, the inhabitants of the village have access to this place of worship? Or was it purely the place of worship for the lords? If the latter was the case, it leaves us with the question as to where the place of worship for the villagers was located. It is equally possible that there was a small oratory in the keep of the castle, and that the church was largely as we know it today ? open to the villagers. There is no record either in the locals? memory or the official files that suggests the presence of an oratory inside the castle. That a small village would have two churches so close to each other would be enigmatic. Perhaps the church was of such a structure that lords and villagers were nevertheless separated ? or perhaps the church was built over two floors.
Whatever scenario corresponds to reality, the question for the moment has to remain open. The most likely suggestion is that the chapel of the lords became the church of the town when the Treaty of the Pyrenees came into effect. The presence of the cemetery to the side of the church suggests that this is indeed the oldest place of worship in Perillos ? because if there were other locations, then it would be likely that the cemetery was located there.

Strange sitings of three chapels

{alt}The territory of Perillos has three chapels:
- There is the above mentioned chapel of the lords, which became the village church, under the patronage of St Michael. It is the only place of active worship.
- There is the chapel just outside the village, along the road in the valley, placed under the protection of St Barbara, whose statue is represented in the church. Though recently restored and open to the public, it is no longer a site of worship.
- Finally, there is a third chapel, in the hamlet of ?Bel Auriole?, formerly known as ?Vall Oriole?. The chapel sits on private property and does not seem to be the focus of any specific worship.
From the above list, we have excluded the oratories and martyrdoms that were once part of the territory. There remain no traces on the ground of the oratories and there are not enough written elements that allow the known constructions to be located. As to the martyrdoms, those have all been destroyed at the end of the 18th century, though it is still possible to locate some of the sites from a register of the church of Perillos, to find nothing but a scattered base or vestige on the site where they were erected.

Multiple owners and chapels

{alt}The old chapel-church of Perillos seems to be a normal building ? no immediate questions are raised concerning its locality. St Michael is normally the protector of elevated points in the landscape, and hence is a logical choice as the patron saint.
The dedication of the chapel to Saint Barbara is a little more delicate. She is usually venerated by mining corporations, the artillery and trades connected with fire (such as firemen). She was killed by lightning, and hence she can also be called upon against accidents that are caused by weather phenomena. Still, some authors claim that she was worshipped here as she protected shepherds, and that this is the reason why she was chosen as the patron saint. But any observation of the topography of the site will make it clear that there is little chance that shepherds preferred it as the grazing grounds for their herds. On the other hand, several official documents attest to the existence of old mines in the immediate vicinity of this chapel. It would thus be logical to assume that the site was a ritual place for the protection of the workmen that worked in dangerous conditions nearby.
Finally, the small chapel of ?Vall Oriole?, under the protection of Saint Theresa, was reserved for services that were held in the hamlet itself. At one point, it sheltered more than 60 inhabitants and can thus be compared ? size-wise ? with the village of Perillos itself. It is now the only inhabited site on Perillos? territory. Normally, it would be smaller service or urgent matters that would have occurred in this sanctuary ? the more important religious aspects would have occurred in the main church of the village.

Worship from the past?

It is clear that worship in the village of Perillos goes back to the first centuries of the Christian era. The church, in its current still, still comprises architectural elements that allow it to be dated from pre-Roman times, as well as Roman. It would be not too contentious to argue that the site may have been a place of worship in pre-Christian times, which was then converted into a Christian site with the arrival of that religion. Possibly, it was a site once marked by a standing stone or a dolmen or another megalithic construction.
A document dating from the 15th century mentions the existence of St Barbara?s chapel. The current construction thus seems to be built on top of an older building. Once again, the site may have prehistoric origins.
Finally, shards of pottery and other remains can be found in and around Vall Oriole, scattered in the vineyards. Once again, it is proof of Mankind?s ancient occupation of this sector. Moreover, the presence of three Visigothic tombs, found in ca. 1890, is proof of Mankind?s continued presence.
Let us also add that the three sites had natural water points, which is underlined by the presence of bronze and other ceramic pottery found in or near the sites.

Anachronistic axes

{alt}So far, nothing about these places of worship seems controversial. But some aspects of these chapels are a little less ordinary, such as the orientation of these places of worship.
The main church is aligned on the East-West axis, perfectly conforming to the standard of Christian churches. However, when one carefully observes certain details of the building, specifically the ancient walls and the arch, one comes to two conclusions. The first is that the church must have been part of the castle. The second is that the church was aligned north-south. It means that at some point, possibly with the annexation of Roussillon to the French crown (in the 16th century), that chapel and castle were split apart, and the chapel was realigned to the standard east-west orientation.
If this was an isolated case, it would not be exceptional ? just worthy of a mention. But in Perillos, it seems that the exception is the norm?

Eccentric chapels

{alt}The chapel of St Barbara is that of a nave with direct access, finished by a semicircle. Its general axis is also north-south, with the entrance in the south.
The chapel of Vall Oriole is a small and rather recent building, but its orientation is also north-south. The entrance is once again in the south. Though of recent date, it is more than likely that the present building sits on top of an older construction, whose derelict status required the erection of the new structure. Documents from the 17th century mention the presence of a ? d?un chaspel hours les b?tis ?, a chapel outside the buildings.
Thus we have three chapels, all built on a north-south axis. This is a major deviation from the standard. Most often, such deviations are rare. Most likely, the deviation from the east-west axis is a result of the terrain, whereby the traditional alignment is impossible. This is not the case in Perillos. Even though off-set buildings are normally remnants from pre-Christian monuments, they are seldom orientated north-south. The question therefore needs to be posed why all three chapels belonging to the lords of Perillos thus have an extra-ordinary orientation, and why it is not merely ?not east-west?, but specifically north-south?

Under the control of the lords

The old chapel of the castle was inevitably a realization that was entirely under the control of the lords of Perillos: the builders would act upon their directives. And as it was within their fortress, all their desires could be realized, without any opposition from anyone.
The chapel of St Barbara sits within a short distance of the medieval village, close to the ancient mounds. It sits on feudal grounds of the lords of Perillos. The same situation applies to the Vall Oriole hamlet, which sits less than 2 kilometres from the village.
It is unimaginable to assume that the whole group of buildings (more than ten hearths) was owned by the local people, or another lord, but not the lords of Perillos. This hamlet belongs to the lords of Perillos, as is attested in documents by Courtade, the royal notary who indexed the territory for the annexation of the Roussillon to the Crown of France.
This merely to underline that it is virtually impossible to claim that the lords of Perillos did not know what was happening on their domains, certainly not when the distances involved were so short.

Ridiculed criteria?

The construction of a chapel always answers to precise criteria as regards its orientation. One might suppose that the stonemasons employed in Perillos were particularly ignorant of these simple rules, but then it seems that they were perfectly familiar as to how to align these monuments north-south. Furthermore, it is clear that the construction of these chapels is spread over many centuries, and thus it would mean that it was not just one craftsman, but an entire series of craftsmen that got it wrong. Furthermore, these craftsmen only ever seemed to get it wrong in Perillos, and nowhere else in the vicinity.
Even if the craftsmen were particularly stupid, one cannot imagine that these of buildings never received a visit of the lord during their construction. Or from a chaplain or anyone else who had even the most basic understanding of church design and orientation. Even if it was an error once, it would not have been tolerated to occur three times, in three different locations and times.
It leaves one likelihood: that the north-south orientation on all occasions was the specific intent of the Masters ? most likely the lords of Perillos. But why would he have wanted such a divergence from the norm?

Lines of sight

{alt}This north-southern orientation is not the only anomaly. The IGN map of Durban Corbi?res-Leucate gives the most detailed overview of the site that is commercially available. The scale is 1 centimeter to 250 metres.
When we have identified all three points on the map, we note another anomaly: all sit on a straight line. For sure, any two points will sit on a straight line. But that three points sit on a straight line is already more interesting. That these three points are furthermore three chapels ? and the only chapels ? is most likely not a coincidence. But the possible coincidence turns into an even bigger oddity when we extend the line further north, to see that the line crosses the top of Montoulli? de P?rillou, the highest peak in the region. The site is also known as the Mount of Olives, even though olives never grew there. But the mountain is distinguished, as it now has a very visible radar station, operated by M?t?o France. It was the northernmost part of the Roussillon, as beyond it had always belonged to the crown of France. Beyond that point, it left the jurisdiction of the lords of Perillos.

The existence of this line might seem odd. Yet it does not need satellite technology to know that these three sites sit on one line. Such observations could have occurred by chance, or by careful observation of the land, which so often occurred in megalithic times ? as can be seen with all the other megalithic monuments that were not substituted with Christian churches. To guarantee a perfect alignment, such simple devices as a fire on a breezeless day or night would be able to validate whether or not the sites were aligned.
If we continue the line beyond the territory of Perillos, it crosses ?Mas Farines? and the ruins of the ?Convent of St Cecile?. Mas Farines sat on the defensive line of Perillos and thus presented an outpost of Vall Oriole.

Incorporating Vall Oriole

{alt}Why would Vall Oriole have been incorporated into this line? It might have been an advanced position for the defense of the village. It is impossible to circumvent the hamlet on one?s travels from that direction towards the territory of Perillos, or even the castle of Opoul on the plateau. From Vall Oriole, there are magnificent views towards that plateau, as well as to the enigmatic Roc Redon that rests in the valley below the plateau. It is this feature that was incorporated by B?renger Sauni?re, the village priest of Rennes-le-Ch?teau, in his enigmatic model. We can only wonder whether Sauni?re himself might have stumbled on the Roc on some of his travels through the region, coming from this direction.

When coincidence is design

If one takes the following details into account, can one still speak about coincidence?
- Three chapels on the territory of P?rillos are built, inevitably under the supervision of the lords of Perillos.
- Three chapels that are installed on points that are related to very old worship.
- All are aligned north-south, contrary to the Christian standard.
- The three chapels are located on a line, incorporating the Mount of Olives, continuing to the ruins of an old, forgotten convent.
It indeed seems difficult to regard these facts as the fruit of chance. However, this accumulation of elements must have a precise significance. It cannot be a question of a momentary whim of a local lord.So why do it?
{alt}
Is the secret of Perillos ?on line??

Obviously, at the origin of this anachronism that is repeated with a frightening precision, there must be an imperative, known or imposed by the Lords of P?rillos. But why? And how was it retained throughout the ages? Did each lord pass it on to his successor? And if so, would they all have done this without knowing the reason why generation after generation their heirs were told that if ever they constructed a chapel, it had to be aligned north-south?
Furthermore, does it have any bearing on the enigma that resides within their territory? Did they use it as ingredients in a soup that they were mixing, leaving little clues that would underline the importance of something that was present on their territory? But what can we learn from an alignment of four sites that seems to have been forgotten about? What could anyone else learn from this?

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg50910.html#msg50910
http://www.perillos.com/3egl_michel.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/3egl_barbe.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/3egl_oriole2.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/perillos_chapel1p.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/3egl_oriole1.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/meteo%20Perillos_lo.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/3egl_rodoun.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/3eglises.jpg




Logged

Lucky Luc

Offline hardluck
Gold Member
*

Join Date: Aug, 2009
Thank you2

Activity
0%
Posts: 1739
Referrals: 0

8885.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2009, 04:14:03 am »
Go Up Go Down

Luc and Simpson

Thank you both for an interesting posts.

Hardluck

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg51173.html#msg51173




Logged
Offline salvor6
Mod
Silver Member
*****

Pirate of the Martires
Join Date: Aug, 2006
Thank you0

Activity
4%
Male
United States
Posts: 525
Referrals: 0

2747.00 Gold
View Inventory

WWW Awards

Aquapulse, Fisher Proton 3 mag, Pulse Star Pro II, Humminbird 1198 side scan sonar.
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2009, 05:31:33 am »
Go Up Go Down

Thanks for the post. Lots of interesting info there.

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg51182.html#msg51182




Logged
Offline Luc
Moderator
Silver Member
*****

Live it is a treasure to enrich the spirit
Join Date: Sep, 2009
Thank you8

Activity
36%
Male
France
Posts: 1162
Referrals: 0

3355.00 Gold
View Inventory

WWW Awards

Fisher F75, Tesoro Eldorado
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2009, 08:58:27 am »
Go Up Go Down

Henri Boudet: the mystery priest of Rennes-les-Bains
 

Another priest, but not just any priest

The man who would go down as the ?other priest? and potentially the one who controlled Sauni?re, was born Jean-Jacques Henri Boudet, on November 16, 1837 at Quillan. In fact, Boudet?s life could be described as a north-south movement: his father was the director of the iron works near Axat; he was born in Quillan; he would work in Rennes-les-Bains. At the end of his life, he would eventually move down south again, to Axat, where he lies buried.
Remarkably, though his family came from Axat, and he himself was buried there, his mother, Marie Antonia, was buried in Rennes-les-Bains, as was his sister, who worked as Henri?s housekeeper. His mother died in 1895, his sister in 1896, underlining that those two years must have been troublesome times for Boudet.
In fact, Boudet had to cope with much loss. His younger brother Edmond died before him, in 1907. Edmond worked as a notary in Axat and his name has become part of the mystery, as he produced the maps and sketches for one of Henri?s books ? which is seen by many as to why Boudet is part and parcel of ?the mystery?.

The enigmatic book

{alt}  Boudet is now included for his enigmatic book "La Vraie Langue Celtique et le Cromlech de Rennes-les-Bains". The book argues that English is the original Celtic language. The book reads like a rather bad joke, or a new age book several decades before they became popular. It also argues that around Rennes-les-Bains, there is a cromlech, which is equally a long stretch of the imagination, as an absolute majority of the structures Boudet includes are natural, not man-made megalithic constructions.
An extra-ordinary amount of interest has gone towards this book, which is largely because it is believed to contain a code: that the madness is like a layer of veneer, which, when removed, or broken, will reveal a wonderful painting, or the answer to the mystery. For originally, Boudet was seen as being as enigmatic as Sauni?re. For example, it is known ? and a fact ? that Boudet channelled money to Sauni?re. Though some have immediately seen this as bizarre, Rennes-les-Bains was a popular spa town, with rich visitors. Boudet and his colleague Sarda therefore often dealt with people that were dying, or ill, found or rediscovered their religion, and expressed their thanks in their faith by offering donations, some of which seem to have gone not directly to the bishopric, but were instead ?managed? by Sarda, Boudet and, it seems, Sauni?re. That can be proven, but all the rest ? why Boudet shared this money with Sauni?re ? is speculation. Why, indeed, would you share money with a fellow priest who receives far more than he should?

And its history

{alt}  However, back to ?the book?. The book was completed in 1880 and published in 1886, roughly the time when Sauni?re became stationed in nearby Rennes-le-Ch?teau. Boudet had to finance the project himself: 500 copies were produced at a cost of 5382 gold francs. Of the 500 copies, only 98 were sold, underlining how poor the book was received, reflecting the standard of the material in it. A further 100 copies were donated to libraries, while 200 copies were distributed by Boudet as gifts to friends, as well as visitors to Rennes-les-Bains. Indeed, one might argue that Boudet had seen a potential gap in the market: people coming to Rennes, who are ill, have little to do, often want to read, and read something about the local history. If that were the case, Boudet could definitely have made his book better accessible. And perhaps he did realise as much, eventually.
The remaining 102 copies were destroyed in 1914, when Boudet was old, and the book almost two decades old and therefore unlikely to sell. Still, some argue that it was Bishop de Beaus?jour who had ordered Boudet to accept their pulping. As one might expect, questions are asked as to the bishop?s possible involvement, to heap mystery onto something that does not seem to warrant any: if de Beaus?jour wanted this book urgently destroyed, he would have done so much earlier, not more than a decade into his posting as bishop of Carcassonne.

Other history books

However, Boudet also wrote more mainstream books on local history: The Name of Narbonne / Du Nom de Narbonne, published in 1880, Remarks on the Dialect of the Languedoc / Remarques sur le Dialecte Languedocien (1894) and The Book of Axat / Le Livre d?Axat (1896). It seems that after La Vraie Langue Celtique, he had grown up, intellectually, and was now able to write ?non-fiction?.
He is also accredited as the author of ?Lazare V?ni Foras?, which some argue has two editions, one from 1891, the other 1914. However, as outlined elsewhere, this work is usually regarded as a hoax, and not at all of Boudet?s hand.
His interest in archaeology ? in evidence from his publications ? made him become a member of the Soci?t? des Arts et des Sciences de Carcassonne, where he gave two presentations, one on November 5, 1893 and another on November 3, 1896.

The archaeologist

{alt}  Boudet made extensive walks in the area, was interested in archaeology and photography ? interests he definitely shared with Sauni?re. Though Sauni?re and Boudet knew each other, the extent of their friendship remains unknown. But seeing they had so many common interests, it seems quite likely that the men met quite regularly. If not, that would have been quite remarkable? and might even suggest there was a reason why the two colleagues and neighbours avoided each other.
Boudet?s interest in archaeology were widely known, and when a sculpted head was found near the town, it was brought to Boudet, who had it placed in the garden wall of the presbytery, where it is now known as the ?T?te du Sauveur?.
His long walks made him very familiar with the local area and will have led him to see the various megalithic and other ancient monuments of the area, many of whom were written down in his articles and books. He is also known to have taken an interest in the history of Notre-Dame-de-Marceille, and liaised with the local priest, who was writing his own history of that site. Some of this material ended up in La Vraie Langue Celtique, which shows that his interest in this site existed early on.

Prehistory

For a man who was interested in history and prehistory, Boudet?s own prehistory, prior to his arrival in Rennes-les-Bains, has been ill-studied. He studied at the Petit Seminaire, then the Grand Seminaire, in Carcassonne and was ordained priest on Christmas 1861. His first posting was as vicar of Durban-Corbi?res, a position he took up on January 1, 1862; he was transferred to Caunes-Minervois on June 16, 1862, followed by a posting to Frestes on November 1, 1866. On October 16, 1872, a decade after his ordination, he arrived in Rennes-les-Bains, where he would remain until the end of his calling.
As we keep underlining: as vicar of Durban-Corbi?res, he was also responsible for the community of Perillos and in Durban itself, the archives of the old parish of Perillos had been relocated, so he would have had access to these, if he so desired ? or was instructed to do. And he was not the only person with a prehistory in Durban, as the famously murdered priest G?lis, who lived in Coustaussa, had equally been posted there. And we know that Sauni?re would at one point in his life frequent Durban, speaking to prominent local families, apparently in search of documents to do with the history of the region. This would suggest that even in casual conversations, without Boudet fully aware, Sauni?re might have been trying to find out ?things? about Durban.

Boudet?s name also comes up in the ?transmission account?, a document which tries to argue how information in the possession of Bigou, the priest of Rennes-les-Ch?teau at the time of the French Revolution, ended up being known by Sauni?re. The account is unsubstantiated by historical facts even though, it has to be said, too few ?researchers? have delved into this stream.
Remarkably, this transmission account focuses on the role of another enigmatic priest, Cayron, whom, the account argues, financed the education of the young Henri Boudet. There is no direct evidence for this either. As to why Cayron financed Henri?s education: it is said that he was a family friend of the Boudet family, allowing him to enter the seminary in Carcassonne. It is added that he was even a student of Cayron, who was apparently instrumental in allowing Boudet to study English ? the language he would greatly abuse in his ?masterwork? ?The True Celtic Language?. The account argues that it was Boudet who told Sauni?re of the secret that was present in his village of Rennes-le-Ch?teau.

A history of notaries

{alt}  The extent to which his brother Edmond was involved, is hard to estimate. But we can make a few basic observations. First, Edmond was a notary in Axat. We know that one well-known aspect of the mystery is a will of Fran?ois-Pierre, Baron d'Hautpoul, which was registered by Antoine Captier, a notary of Esp?raza on November 23, 1644. This is the timeframe of royal notary, Courtade, who at the same time is collating inventories of possessions in the region. Courtade was based in Quillan. These documents would later end up with a notary in Durban-Corbi?res. There is no evidence that Edmond Boudet ever visited Durban, but it is not a stretch of the imagination that Edmond visited his brother during his posting in Durban. It is nevertheless unlikely that a brief encounter with a notary of Durban occurred, though, as it has to be mentioned, in 1862, Edmond was only 22 years old. Either way, it is clear that some key information was in the hands of notaries, and Edmond?s job gave him certain privileges which would have come in handy, if Boudet was indeed looking for something. Even leaving Durban-Corbi?res and Courtade outside the scope, the possible involvement of Edmond Boudet with the Hautpoul will has received too little attention, specifically as this will is more than likely at the very core of the mystery.

The end

Boudet?s posting at Rennes-les-Bains ended on April 30, 1914. He was in poor health, but apparently, he was also unable to pay the rent on the presbytery. Indeed, though Sauni?re?s monetary problems late in life have been widely reported, that Boudet seemed to have a lack of funds at the same time, is less widely reported.
Boudet moved to his family home at Axat. On March 30, 1915, he died, from intestinal cancer.
{alt}  Even in death, Boudet continued to create havoc. Buried at Axat in the grave of his brother Edmond, the tomb has a somewhat enigmatic raised section, which has the inscription IXOIS and a carved open book. Various theories about what this supposedly means, have been posited, including the popular ? though highly unlikely ? theory that the open book and the inscription somehow are a coded reference ? a key ? that one needs to study a specific page of La Vraie Langue Celtique, and that, as such, all will become clear. However, those who have applied this technique, have became anything but illuminated.

It is said that upon his death his books and papers were thrown upon the rubbish dump at Axat, where they were recovered by a local family in whose possession they remain today. If this were true, the question remains whether they contain anything of value. Were these more wanderings of his archaeological mind, or might some of his papers indeed contain information that provide us with insights into his own finances, or clues about his role, or not, in the mystery?
In the end, Boudet, however much he wrote, remains a closed book: far more enigmatic than Sauni?re, he is often seen as true centre of the mystery? but he is definitely a mystery all of his own.
Posted on: September 24, 2009, 08:40:41 AM
More pictures and Videos

More pictures and videos

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KucL2xVSZfk" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KucL2xVSZfk</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYVRIfrno4U" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYVRIfrno4U</a>

Rennes le Ch?teau Part One

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L16NgUG3G6Q" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L16NgUG3G6Q</a>

Rennes le Ch?teau Part Two

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0lZw3LZLag" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0lZw3LZLag</a>

Rennes le Ch?teau Part Three

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDDLYxL_BfI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDDLYxL_BfI</a>

Rennes le Ch?teau Part Four

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk9RTHOL4oE" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk9RTHOL4oE</a>

Rennes le Ch?teau Part Five

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vJYb_KHDCU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vJYb_KHDCU</a>

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg51208.html#msg51208
http://www.perillos.com/boudet.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/celtique_05.gif
http://www.perillos.com/lazare_04.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/celtique_02.jpg
http://www.perillos.com/celtique_06.jpg



There are 3 attachment(s) in this post which you can not view or download

Please register for viewing them.

Tombe_Boudet_livre_web.jpg
Tombe_Boudet_web_web.jpg
carte_boudet_LR_blanchefort_web.jpg


« Last Edit: September 24, 2009, 09:02:39 am by Luc »
Logged

Lucky Luc

Offline goldigger
Silver Member
*

Join Date: Jun, 2009
Thank you0

Activity
0%
Male
Canada
Posts: 1126
Referrals: 0

5405.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards

Bounty  Hunter and several more.
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2009, 12:29:29 pm »
Go Up Go Down

Why was Boudet paying money to Sauni?re?

There may not be a shred of proof at this late date but I would bet he was paying Sauni?re to keep silent, about something.... that would explain the lack of association. It may explain some of the apparent wealth Sauni?re may seem to have had.

goldigger

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg51407.html#msg51407




Logged

goldigger

Offline Christian
Administrator
Platin Member
*****

Wuf! Wuf!
Join Date: Sep, 2006
Thank you27

Activity
0%
Male
Independent Rouge States
Posts: 5231
Referrals: 0

2300.00 Gold
View Inventory

WWW Awards
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2009, 11:13:30 pm »
Go Up Go Down

Thank you for these two absolutely amazing posts Luc!

Regards,

Christian

Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg51463.html#msg51463




Logged

THunting.com - Your Friendly One Stop Treasure Resource

Offline chrisblake
Pull Tab
*

Join Date: Aug, 2010
Thank you0

Activity
0%

United Kingdom
Posts: 7
Referrals: 0

25.00 Gold
View Inventory

Awards
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2010, 07:14:31 am »
Go Up Go Down

Truthseeker: I intend to read all of Ben Hammott's book. You have convinced me it's worth reading. I saw this post some time ago (Hope this thread comes alive now I have posted) and at first I didn't believe his claims although now I do. I have found a source of information myself (a new book from unlikely source) which seems to corroborate what he is saying. At first it sounds ludicrous to suggest that you would spot gold through a small opening but not be able to actually reach it. But what if that is intentional and if the gold keeps being replenished because people are meant to find it? Also, like the well in the field in Henry Lincoln's book near the Valley of God, maybe somebody has covered it over? The well now has a farm-house built over the top of it. If you check google maps and look for the triangular field, you will see what I mean. Somebody (custodians?) is covering over the evidence just as quickly as they are leaking clues. I firmly believe that we are all  being fed clues  - many and varied, for a reason. I am going to expound on this soon but I don't want to give too much away about my own ideas.
Chris
For anybody who might be interested. I am going to to Rennes in a few weeks time - for a three week expedition. However I am looking for a sponsor - somebody who is interested in the treasure and maybe publishing our findings. I have developed some theories and I am going to investigate  but  I don need finantial assistance to take it much further. My study will focus on the area called Pas de Loup. I don't think this area has been investigated enough and my source leads me to believe this is a  place to look at. It has not been researched at all as far as I can see and yet the name: Pas de Loup - at first I thought it meant the Wolf Pass because my French is not good. But actually it means 'not wolf'. Now why would a mountain pass be called 'not wolf'. I have a theory which I won't say yet. I need to check. It comes  out of clues in a a book I have found  by Lazlo Ferran. The book is called:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

Ordo Lupus and the Temple Gate
.
I believe Ordo Lupus is the modern cover for the Cathares and that they are coordinating all this and they know where the treasure is. It has  been moved from Rennes which is where it was. The title, if you take it as an anagram decodes as Montsegur and something about apples or a dowry hidden in Rennes. I think everybody is getting too confused by all the details and side alleys and missing the simple stuff which is right in front of them. You can read more on my blog:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

The Secret Rennes le Chateau Treasure


Linkback:

You are not allowed to view links.
Please Register or Login

http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php/topic,7100.msg110951.html#msg110951




Logged
Print
Pages:  1 2   Go Up
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2005, Simple Machines | Sitemap
Copyright THunting.com