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Offline tabdogTopic starter
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« on: July 25, 2009, 03:36:33 pm »
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Hi Folks,

I got together with Little Dave and his significant other
this morning and we went lookin for a place to find some
old coins or relics. We went to three different places. No
luck at all hardly. Some pieces of horse shoes, and Little
Dave found a crank case ventilator filter cap off a very old
truck, and a bottle cap that said "1889" on it.

I hated to tell him that it was probably " sense 1889",
but he seemed to take it OK,,,,, lol

We will see after it is cleaned off.

At this park, they had cleared off some area behind tha
tot lot.

{alt}

Back there I found a curious lead object. I know how
lead patina looks when it is 150 years old as opposed
to 90 years old. I know that this object is approximately
150 years old, or older.

{alt}

It weighs almost 2 grams less than tha Confederate 52
caliber mini ball in tha photo above.

Here is more views.

{alt}

{alt}

{alt}

{alt}

I think it is a fishing line weight.

What do you think?

Tabdog


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Offline metal_inspector
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« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2009, 04:58:20 pm »
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Hm, almost looks like a buckle.  But, buckles were not made out of lead, as far as I know.  Maybe a child's toy? I doubt it, just a guess.  It could of possibly been some sort of object, and maybe was near a fire.  It seems like to me that it was melted.  Again, just a suggestion, I doubt it is right.  Interesting though!!

~Metal_Inspector~

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Offline GoldDigger1950
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2009, 05:22:30 pm »
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Years ago, I visited a Civil War museum where they had a display of tiny figures carved and annealed from Munie balls. The tiny figures were apparently the work of one soldier. I forget which side now but the figures were so exquisite and the patina made them look quite elegant. There were also displays of bitten ammo used during surgery in the field (ouch) and other items made from lead. That does look like a fishing sinker to me.

I also remember a good friend of mine from many, many years ago using bags of lead in canvas to test his scales (quick and dirty test - not calibration) in his butcher shop. The bags had the weight printed on them by hand in ink. When he closed down the shop on his retirement, we opened the bags and found he had used dozens and dozens of Revolutionary War era musket balls and some Civil War era bullets he had gotten from his father, grandfather and who knows where else? There were also some very old copper coins in among the lead just to tweak it up to the right weight. He kept those under the counter for years and years as did his father and grandfather. Sadly, he had no children so the shop closed.

He is long gone now but thanks for bringing his memory alive for me again, Tabdog.

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Offline tabdogTopic starter
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2009, 06:13:53 pm »
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Years ago, I visited a Civil War museum where they had a display of tiny figures carved and annealed from Munie balls. The tiny figures were apparently the work of one soldier. I forget which side now but the figures were so exquisite and the patina made them look quite elegant.

That is really cool. I would love to see that. Carved bullets are common,
but they just mostly used them to wittle with.

There were also displays of bitten ammo used during surgery in the field (ouch) and other items made from lead.

Here is two medicin bullets I found.

{alt}

{alt}

This is a fishing line weight made out of a three ringer mini ball. I
found this along tha Arkansas River.

It was first flattened out, and then folded over tha fishin line.

{alt}

{alt}

Happu Huntin,

Tabdog


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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2009, 06:24:52 pm »
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Call forensics! Get a dental cast on those bullets, mate! If only the bullets could tell the tale of how they got where they did. I suppose an armchair philosopher could ask the same of any lost item.

I think you're right about the original picture. It was probably an improvised fishing weight.

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« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2009, 07:43:31 pm »
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The medicin bullets are prised possesions to me. It is amazing to hold
in my hand. They did not just chew them just while under the knife. It
took for ever to mend. Every time they had to get up and go to tha
bathroom would probably call for a bullet and a holler.

My great grand uncle was Newton James Phelps. Inlisted in the Confederate
Army on March 27, 1862. Womded at Murfresburg, Tennesse on December 31,
1862. Captured at Chicamauga, Georgia on October 10,1863. He was sent to
a prisoner of war detention center near Indianapolis, Indiana. On February 26,
1865 he was parolled and shipped to City Point, Virgina to be released.

He was given used civilian clothing and a badly worn pair of shoes. They gave
him no underware, and no socks.

With the meager help of near destitute families along the way, He walked most
of the way back to Choctaw County, Mississippi, barefooted.

That is a distance of over 850 miles.

It took two years for him to recover, although he never completely recovered.
But he did marry and have three young children. Then he died leaving his wife
to raise three girls on a farm in Mississippi.

That is what I call a " hard row to hoe "

That is just one of simular stories in my family history.

Happy Huntin,

Tabdog

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« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2009, 11:04:06 pm »
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tabdog;

Interesting thangie, when you turn it over, it looks like a splattered bullet.

Remember, some of the first bullets, for riflings, were hollow base. The theory was, the burning powder forced the bullet tighter to the riflings. what happens when one of those splats against iron?

It also seems to me some were lead tubing, even

The carcano was one of those hollow base bullets.

Its too rough, on the other side, to be a fish weight, that would have been smooth  hammered and a crack at one end, kind of like a bagel... but dont try eating it.

150 yrs would be just 5 years before my grampa was born, 1857, or, the year my great grampa was born.

Brian AKA goldigger.

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« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2009, 11:25:48 pm »
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Wait.....if they bit down on them, I would think that they would get possible lead poisoning? I mean, I would think so.  Of course, everyone is subject to their own opinions.

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« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 11:28:31 pm by metal_inspector »
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« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2009, 11:49:02 pm »
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Tab dog;

I have read of others, that were imprisoned, during the civil war, very similar to your great grand uncle.... some survived, some never left the prison, alive. most were dumped out and left to fend for themselves.

I have to tell you about my great great grandpa Napoleon Stone, in Texas. As you may know, Texas didnt really join either side and many texans took shelter in the militia, to avoid service, in the war, but some of the militia wound up on the battle field, anyway.

My great great grandpa, who had a large family, joined the Texas ranger militia and wound up looking after a stage coach stop, in west Texas, for the duration of the war and fought Indians. Later, after the war, he was among the group that raised the first stars and stripes over the county court house, in his home county.  He was a teacher, justice of the peace, and a farmer.

Of course, he had a big family and, even though my great great grandma and one of his daughters, died in the big measles epidemic, at the end of the 1800s, his descendants are spread all over Washington, BC (Can), Idaho, Oregon and probably California.

My one great grandfather and a great great grandfather were preachers and never got near the fighting, another great great grandfather, injured a knee, while quote skirmishing unquote, and was mustered out. He later applied for a pension and got, if I remember right, $15 a month, which was a lot of money for those times.

Tabdog, can you tell me for sure, what a quote Blackbirder unquote, was??? Its what my great great grampa Wyrick, a preacher, said HE was proud of being. There is some confusion as to whether he helped escaped slaves or recaptured them, being a preacher I cant see the recapture.  Maybe you can help me sort out a family dilemma.

I like to collect genealogy stuff and family (handed down) history..... no horse thieves but some strange goings on.

Metal detecting and gold hunting keep me out of family squables over some of the family history, thats good, I think.

Brian AKA goldigger (an history digger)

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« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2009, 06:32:16 am »
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Hay Bryan,

A "Blackbirder" was a person engaged in the slave trade especially in the South Pacific.
"Blackbirds" were South Pacific islanders kidnapped for use as plantation laborer.

That is interestin about your heritage. There must have been a lot of preachers in Texas.

My great, great grand uncle Ed was a preacher in east Texas. He would get an Indian
interpreter to help him go out and try to spread tha gospel to the Indians.

He was reported to know Geronimo.

But, it turns out that he called all his interpreters Geronimo. lol

HH,

Tabdog

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