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Offline xavier
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« Reply #90 on: June 15, 2010, 07:01:25 am »
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Hi Hardluck

Gold in Liberia is mined almost entirely from alluvial deposits. Gold mining began in 1881 with the establishment of a Liberian-owned company. Other operators and individual miners exploited gold-bearing alluvial deposits in the early 1900s, but the total amount of gold recovered
before War World I was routinely quite small. After WWI, gold was found in numerous river and stream deposits throughout Liberia, and placer mining became widespread. Mine output varied greatly, and many deposits were small and they were soon exhausted. In 1938 some 2,080 ounceswere exported. In 1943 a new discovery of gold in Grand Cape Mount County led to a gold rush;that year almost 31,000 ounces were exported, and nearly the same amount was exported in 1944. A decline in output subsequently occurred, but in 1950 exports still were above 12,000 ounces a year. Available data on gold for the 1950s and 1960s were based on purchases by the Bank of Monrovia, to which by law any gold mined in Liberia had to be sold. During these two decades the amount bought in most years was less than 2,000 ounces. Until the late 1970s purchases continued to remain small because the fixed purchase price was $35 an ounce at a time when open market prices were substantially higher. Gold mining was also restricted to Liberian citizens.

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Offline mfitzs70
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« Reply #91 on: June 15, 2010, 10:31:18 am »
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Lets see 17 people with an undisclosed amount of gold  Idea  hmmmm undisclosed amount/17= were rich...How far can a full tank of gas take them?

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« Reply #92 on: June 15, 2010, 03:04:33 pm »
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Mfitzs70

1600 miles but then you will have to reduce the cargo to 2729Kg less the occupants @ 95 Kg = 1615 Kg  that's 1114 Kg of gold and silver divide that by 17 and you have 65.53 kg per customer ....not bad.

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« Reply #93 on: June 16, 2010, 02:50:09 am »
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Hello All

Thank you all for the interesting posts.

Interesting theory, but if these men had stolen the gold and abandoned the plane some where. Surely Some of them being American would of eventually turned up back in United states. Another thing it would of been hard for any of them to sell gold in the United States as it was still under anti gold hoarding laws that was still in place from the great depression.

That said it was not impossible that they sold the gold elsewhere and returned back there with money. However all forms of international transportation was still under military control in 1946.

I am still inclined to think that there may of been all an accident either off the coast or in the mountains possibly near cape Palmer. But from the weather report there seemed nothing really severe enough to bring down a Dakota. They were a very reliable aircraft. However not immune to mechanical failure or human error.

The mystery remains.

Hardluck  Wink Huh?

 

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« Reply #94 on: June 16, 2010, 05:24:49 am »
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Hi Hardluck

I quite agree with you and I have done a lot of thinking about it here is one scenario they don't fly in the direction of Ghana but rather towards Morocco they could have gotten rid of the plane and sold the gold then take a boat to Spain. With stolen identities they could have gone back to the states but perhaps they remained in the UK. As you stated the Dakota was a very reliable plane I saw photos of one that landed with half a wing missing but what if it received a direct hit of lightning? if the plane did go down then it must be between Liberia and Cape Palmas or he would have radioed as ordered and that halves the distance to search unless of course that he went down in the ocean any how there are only two possibilities one the plane went down and two they stole the gold. Do you think that there is any chance that we could get photos of the men concerned?

Xavier         

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« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 05:26:39 am by xavier »
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« Reply #95 on: June 16, 2010, 08:24:49 am »
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Hello Xavier

I tend to agree with your assumption that the plane may of went down between Liberia  and Cape Palmas.

It is an interesting point you make about the Dakota. We could speculate one of men could have been taking home a grenade as a souvenir and had a catastrophic detonation which would of given them no time to use the radio. Or they flew through a cloud into a peak would of had the same result?

Another question we should ask our self is did Dakotas have Audio Radio's fitted or Morse code radio fitted to transport Dakotas in 1946? I read somewhere that fighter planes had voice communication equipment and many transport aircraft still carried a Morse code operator. Depending on operator time taken to get a message in Catastrophic emergency, could be a factor why no message got out?

It is interesting idea you have about flying to Morocco as it has twigged my poor memory about another incident very similar to this event.

I have did through my files. Detecting

Hardluck  Smiley

Ok hello all again

Here is two stories from 1951 of another aircraft missing in the area with 40 passengers and crew on board. Is there a connection? Two aircraft missing 5 years apart, is there a freak weather condition responsible for the disappearances?

Both aircraft was lost around the month of June. Both were unable to send a distress call. Both aircraft flew through the tropical convergence zone around a month of severe lightning and thunderstorm activity.

Some thing else to think about.

Hardluck  Huh?

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MISSING AIRCRAFT SAT 23 JUNE 1951 CANBERRA TIMES.jpg
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« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 11:05:45 pm by hardluck »
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« Reply #96 on: June 17, 2010, 04:16:12 am »
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Hi Hardluck

Here is the radio

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« Reply #97 on: June 17, 2010, 06:07:03 am »
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Hello All

Xavier thank you for the picture of the Dakota Radio.I am afraid I am not knowledgeable of that radio unit in question.

 From the picture I am not sure if can be used for voice radio communication,or Morse code transmitter or both?

I am still not sure if the transport aircraft was fitted with voice radio communication or relied on a Morse code transmitter. It appears that there was a progression of technology as the war progressed. But even after the war ex bombers converted to civilian airliners still had specialist radio operators still using Morse code transmitters.

There is a case in South America in 1947 A British Airliner, a Bomber converted into a Passenger Aircraft. Just before the aircraft crashed in the Andes there was frantic Morse code message? It seems the Morse code system was still used in the 1940's as the preferred method of long range air to ground communication.

The point I was trying to make out that if they had to tap out Morse code only. They may not have had enough time to radio a distress signal before they crashed?

Perhaps some of our historic aircraft enthusiasts can enlighten us on the technology available on the day?

Hardluck  Huh?

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« Reply #98 on: June 17, 2010, 06:54:30 am »
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Here you go

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http://www.propellor.tv/C47%20communications.html


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« Reply #99 on: June 17, 2010, 08:12:51 am »
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Hello Xavier

Well Done with your research and your link. Clapp

Give your self a pat on the back for me.

I have been searching everywhere all I found was this Site of a bewildering array of WW2 Radio transmitters etc...

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http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=14295
with no luck.

The site you found is fantastic as it confirms long range communication was still by Morse code.

Now going back to the Tropical conversion zone, the Dakota has a service ceiling of over 23000 feet. In the 1940's there was little knowledge of the phenomenon of Jetstream and Hadley cells.

Jet streams are fast flowing, narrow air currents found in the atmospheres of some planets. The main jet streams are located near the tropopause, the transition between the troposphere (where temperature decreases with height) and the stratosphere (where temperature increases with height).

The major jet streams on Earth are westerly winds (flowing west to east). Their paths typically have a meandering shape; jet streams may start, stop, split into two or more parts, combine into one stream, or flow in various directions including the opposite direction of most of the jet. The strongest jet streams are the polar jets, at around 7?12 km (23,000?39,000 ft) above sea level, and the higher and somewhat weaker subtropical jets at around 10?16 km (33,000?52,000 ft).

The northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere each have both a polar jet and a subtropical jet. The northern hemisphere polar jet flows over the middle to northern latitudes of North America, Europe, and Asia and their intervening oceans, while the southern hemisphere polar jet mostly circles Antarctica all year round.

Jet streams are caused by a combination of a planet's rotation on its axis and atmospheric heating (by solar radiation and, on some planets other than Earth, internal heat). The Coriolis effect describes how a planet's surface and atmosphere rotate fastest relative to each other at the planet's equator while virtually not rotating at all at the poles.

While this speed difference generally has very little effect on a planet's surface, it plays an important role in atmospheric air currents because air at higher levels of the atmosphere, especially near the equator, must travel very fast to keep up with the planet's rotation. Thus there is a tendency for air at higher levels of the atmosphere to "slip" and fall behind the speed of the air below.

This results in a pressure buildup behind the "slipped" air, and so some air will have to catch up by moving in the same general direction as the planet's rotation (west to east on Earth); however, this air does not follow a simple pattern but instead is also influenced by its temperature and water content compared to that of surrounding air regions. In essence, instead of the atmosphere moving along with the planet consistently, parts of the atmosphere travel faster than others via jet streams.

Jet streams form near boundaries of adjacent air masses with significant differences in temperature, such as the polar region and the warmer air towards the equator.

Meteorologists use the location of some of the jet streams as an aid in weather forecasting. The main commercial relevance of the jet streams is in air travel, as flight time can be dramatically affected by either flying with the flow or against the flow of a jet stream. Clear-air turbulence, a potential hazard to aircraft, often is found in a jet stream's vicinity.

A second factor which contributes to jet sharpness is more appropriate for the subtropical jet, which forms at the poleward limit of the tropical Hadley cell. The subtropical jet forms at the poleward limit of the tropical Hadley cell and to first order this circulation is symmetric with respect to longitude.

Tropical air rises to the tropopause, mainly because of thunderstorm systems in the intertropical convergence zone, and moves poleward before sinking; this is the Hadley circulation. As it does so it tends to conserve angular momentum, since friction is slight above the ground. In the northern hemisphere motions are deflected to the right by the Coriolis force, which for poleward (northward) moving air implies an increased eastward component of the winds. Around 30 degrees from the equator the jet wind speeds have become strong enough that were the jet to extend further polewards the increased winds speed would be unstable..

Both Aircraft flew in a critical month June when temperatures change and wind directions of intertropical convergence zone cold air and hot air collide.  An aircraft entering a Hadley cell could hit a severe up  draft on one side and a catastrophic down draft on the other. Hadley cell can be a few kilometers wide. So the pilot may of corrected the updraft and lowered the altitude of the aircraft only to hit a violent downdraft on the other side of the cell with Catastrophic results. Strange enough there has been several cases of modern Boeing aircraft casualties to this phenomenon.

This could be a possible explanation of what happened in 1946 and in 1951?

If we look at two possibilities if the aircraft went over sea. They were not sighted by personnel at cape Palmer And the extra fuel consumption to weight ratio as it is more of an indirect route.

If the Aircraft tried to fly over the storm cell and a 30 degree crosswind in a more direct route over and over the Putu range then it could be possible that the aircraft hit that mountain range in a rain storm and severe down draft?

Just a theory but the location of crash sites are still a proverbial needle in a haystack in such a jungle clad location.

Hardluck.  Huh?

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